Tracie’s Farm Weekly Newsletter — Dog Days of Summer, kinda…

On the Farm

The ambient temperature would make it seem like the heat has broken, but working out in the fields today it felt as hot as it was last week. The so called “Dog Days of Summer” are technically past us. It comes from Greek tradition and denotes about a six week period of time when the star Sirius in the constellation Canis Major (big dog) rises at the same time as the sun. It was believed that the power of the sun combined with this bright star made it the hottest time of the year. I use it loosely, because mid-August is the dog days, if you ask me.

I was thinking more about why August seems like the hardest month as a farmer. My body is tired and the end is still out of grasp. It’s a time of year that is bemoaned between farmers. Tracie always give a sympathetic look when I am worrying about the farm in August. The flush of energy that comes with spring is behind us, kind of like the plants. Fatigue is starting to set in but we are still in the thick of planting, harvesting, and maintaining most of the beds on the farm. The days are getting shorter, faster, and it is harder to wake up early to get those last few beds prepped before the day begins. Not only that, but plant growth has slowed and the joy of watching plants double in size overnight won’t be seen until next spring. It is the beginning of the wind down to fall and winter and it’s a time where we farmers are tired and facing our last big push before the end of the season.

Right now part of our last push is on hold while we wait for rain again. Story of the summer, really. We have about 15 beds of beets, broccoli, cabbage, cauliflower, lettuce, and probably something else I’m not thinking of at the moment that want to go in the ground ASAP. It is way too dry, and that rain we got last week has pretty much all left the soil already. Even with the cooler weather and our naturally wet soils, it would be a risk to plant starts without rain in the forecast. There is a silver lining, and it is that we get more time to weed! The most popular activity on the veggie farm. One good thing about a dry year is that the weeds don’t take off as quick. We still have a couple beds that are right in a crucial stage where if they don’t get weeded now, they’ll be lost to weeds before they can mature. There is a chance of rain on Wednesday, but if not, we’ll give our starts a heavy dose of fish fertilizer and make sure we stay on track with the plants in the ground.

Rain would be nice for the veggies. More on summer shares below:

SUMMER SHARES WEEK 10!

A reminder that we are on the even week schedule for half shares. FULL SHARES receive a basket every week. HALF SHARES receive a basket every other week.

EVEN WEEKS

Week 2 – 6/22 Week 10 – 8/17
Week 4 – 7/6 Week 12 – 8/31
Week 6 – 7/20 Week 14 – 9/14
Week 8 – 8/3 Week 16 – 9/28

ODD WEEKS

Week 1 – 6/15 Week 9 – 8/10
Week 3 – 6/29 Week 11 – 8/24
Week 5 – 7/13 Week 13 – 9/7
Week 7 – 7/27 Week 15 – 9/21

Arugula is the loose green this week. It won’t be as big of a bag. I know arugula can be a polarizing veggie, but it’s the green that is working for us best right now. I’m not sure what is going on with our lettuce mix, but I have tried seeding it over and over without any luck so far this year. I’ve even moved fields with no luck. I’ll keep trying, but for the time being arugula is the green. Carrots will be in shares. They are the last of our smaller carrots. There are a few new beds that look promising for the coming weeks, but Wednesday will see the end of our early season beds. Celery is new. This won’t look like the celery you get in stores. It is darker green and thinner. Perfect for soups. Cukes are probably seeing their last couple of weeks. It has been a disappointing cucumber year for us. Our high tunnel was over run with cucumber beetles spreading bacterial wilt. Next year we will have to invest in insect netting to exclude them from the growing zone. Eggplant is going to shares. We grow a Japanese eggplant that is long and skinny, and the classic Italian eggplant. They can be used the same. Garlic is a staple. Head Lettuce is back in shares. Peppers, Summer Squash, and Zucchini are all staples. Tomatoes will finally be ready! Both cherries and slicers should make it into shares this week.

Check for recipes below!

Shares Week 10:
Arugula
Carrots
Celery
Cucumbers
Eggplant
Garlic
Head Lettuce
Peppers
Summer Squash and Zucchini
Tomatoes

Egg Share: CHECK LIST FOR NAME
Bread Share: Red Pepper Cheddar CHECK LIST FOR NAME

LINK: YELLOW SQUASH CASSEROLE

This recipe was shared by one of our members! Thank you, Molly!

Ingredients

6 small yellow squash, thinly sliced
½ cup sour cream
2 large eggs, room temperature
1 tablespoon dried minced onion
1 teaspoon fresh thyme
½ teaspoon salt
¼ teaspoon pepper
1 cup grated cheddar cheese
¾ cup panko breadcrumbs
2 tablespoon butter, melted
1 teaspoon garlic salt
1 tablespoon Parmesan cheese
1 tablespoon fresh chopped parsley

Directions

Preheat your oven to 350 degrees F. Lightly grease or spray a 2-quart casserole dish or 9×13-inch baking pan with non-stick cooking spray.
Wash and thinly slice the yellow squash. Place the slices into a large mixing bowl.
In a medium mixing bowl, combine the sour cream, eggs, fresh thyme, salt, and pepper. Fold in grated cheese then pour over the sliced yellow squash. Mix to combine.
Transfer the squash and cheese mixture into the prepared baking dish.
In a small bowl, combine panko breadcrumbs with the melted butter and garlic salt, plus parmesan and fresh parsley if desired. Sprinkle the topping mixture over the squash in your baking dish, then transfer to the center of the middle rack in your preheated oven.
Bake for 30-35 minutes or until the cheese is melted and starting to bubble and the topping is lightly golden brown in color. You can also broil on low for the last few minutes to finish browning the panko topping.
Remove from the oven and serve immediately.

JULIE’S BEET SALAD

Another one from a member! This is for anyone that is still using up their beets from last week.
Thank you, Julie!

Ingredients

Beets sliced thin
Cucumber sliced thin
Onions sliced thin
Chopped cilantro
Himalayan pink salt
Cracked pepper
Olive oil
Balsamic vinegar

Directions

Tossed and marinated in refrigerator for 2 or more hours.

LINK: TOMATO SOUP

I really love tomato soup. It is one of my favorite late summer dishes, especially with grilled cheese.

Ingredients

▢ 2 tablespoons good olive oil
▢ 1 Large Onion chopped
▢ 1 carrot chopped
▢ 2 stalks celery chopped
▢ 3 cloves garlic chopped
▢ 2 cups chicken stock
▢ 56 oz whole tomatoes (two 28oz cans) crushed
▢ salt and freshly ground pepper
▢ ½ cup heavy cream whipping cream or half and half

Directions

Start with adding the carrots, celery, and onion to a food processor with the regular blade.
In a large pot, heat the olive oil over medium heat. Add the chopped onions, carrots and celery and cook over medium-low heat for 10 minutes, stirring occasionally, until soft.
Add the garlic and cook for another minute.
Stir in the chicken stock, tomatoes and salt and pepper to taste.
Bring the soup to a boil, then lower the heat and simmer for 20 minutes.
remove from the heat, add the cream, and using a hand blender carefully puree the soup. If you’re worried about burning yourself, wait until the soup cools before pureeing.

Weekly Update 8/8

On the Farm

Ah, August. What better way to put it than two late nights working on the newsletter in a row. This is the hard month of the season. The weeds wanna grow faster than the plants and the fields need to be rearranged for fall planting, our harvest list keeps growing and everything wants to be picked at once, and we’re trying to keep it all together through the hottest days of the year. August.

On the bright side, the rain we got over the weekend was a huge help. On Saturday morning our area was officially designated as severe drought conditions. I doubt any of the storms will make a huge impact, but raindrops make rivers and we’ll take what we can get. Sever drought conditions can affect crop growth, fruit development, and microbial activity in the soil. It is gonna take a lot of raindrops to correct the current condition.

Planting is a guessing game at this point. The chance of rain jumps from 100 to 0 in an hour. I’m hoping we’ll get a chance to plant tomorrow. Even if it doesn’t rain tomorrow, there is a storm passing over now that might give us enough moisture for the plugs to take. The heat will pass and some cooler days will help the transplants.

Shares are still looking good. I’ll get into them below with updates from the rows.

SUMMER SHARES WEEK 9!

A reminder that we are on the even week schedule for half shares. FULL SHARES receive a basket every week. HALF SHARES receive a basket every other week.

EVEN WEEKS

Week 2 – 6/22 Week 10 – 8/17
Week 4 – 7/6 Week 12 – 8/31
Week 6 – 7/20 Week 14 – 9/14
Week 8 – 8/3 Week 16 – 9/28

ODD WEEKS

Week 1 – 6/15 Week 9 – 8/10
Week 3 – 6/29 Week 11 – 8/24
Week 5 – 7/13 Week 13 – 9/7
Week 7 – 7/27 Week 15 – 9/21

Basil will see its way back into shares this week. We still have a lot in the field and it needs to be cut back to stay productive. Beets are making their long awaited appearance in shares. I’m hoping some later rounds will fare better than our first. They will be small beets this week, but perfect for roasting whole! Plus there is going to be Sage in shares because I think it pairs nicely with beets. Cauliflower is in shares again this week. I recommend buffalo cauliflower. It is not in the recipes this week, but it is an easy one to google. Cucumbers will be in shares for a few more weeks. Our tunnels are looking sad, but there is still some life left in the plants. Fennel is in shares again. Cilantro will be our third herb of the week. It’s a lot of herbs this week due to how things are growing, but they are versatile and elevate any dish you make. Fennel and Cilantro have a recipe below. Garlic is a weekly occurrence. Greens Mix has been reliable. Peppers are in full season. Hopefully Jalapenos as well. Squash! Lots of it! Plus lots on our swap table! It’s coming out of our ears right now. I don’t want to overload members, but I do need to unload a fair amount. Tomatoes. Not yet! Cherries are coming in, but the reds still need another week. We’re giving what we get for the time being. They should come in heavy any day now.

Check for recipes below!

Shares Week 9:
Basil
Beets
Cauliflower
Cilantro
Cucumbers
Fennel
Garlic
Greens Mix
Peppers
Sage
Summer Squash and Zucchini
Tomatoes of some variety

Egg Share: CHECK LIST FOR NAME
Bread Share: Red Pepper Cheddar CHECK LIST FOR NAME

LINK: SAUTEED BEETS WITH PASTA, SAGE, AND BROWN BUTTER

Beets and Sage is one of my favorite combos!

Ingredients

4 tablespoons butter
1 ½ pounds beets, peeled and grated
20 fresh sage leaves
Cooked pasta

Directions

Put butter in a large skillet over medium-high heat. Heat butter until it turns nutty brown, then add the beets and sage leaves.
Cook, stirring occasionally, until the beets are tender and lightly browned, about 10 minutes. Add some cooked pasta and toss. Garnish with Parmesan.

LINK: SUMMER SQUASH AND BASIL PASTA

Ingredients

¼ cup olive oil
8 garlic cloves, thinly sliced
2 pounds assorted summer squashes and zucchini, quartered lengthwise, sliced
Kosher salt
1 teaspoon Aleppo-style pepper, plus more for serving
12 ounces paccheri, ziti, or other large tube pasta
2 ounces Parmesan, grated (about ½ cup), plus more for serving
1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
½ cup basil leaves, divided

Directions

Heat oil in a large skillet over medium. Cook garlic, stirring occasionally, until very lightly browned around the edges, about 4 minutes. Add squash and increase heat to medium high; season with salt. Cook, tossing occasionally, until squash begins to break down. Turn down heat once it begins sticking, and continue to cook until the squash is jammy and soft, 12–15 minutes. Toss in 1 tsp. Aleppo-style pepper.
Meanwhile, cook pasta in a large pot of boiling salted water, stirring occasionally, until very al dente.
Transfer pasta to skillet with squash using a slotted spoon or spider and add ½ cup pasta cooking liquid. Cook pasta, adding 2 oz. Parmesan in stages along with more pasta cooking liquid as needed, until sauce coats pasta and pasta is al dente. Toss in lemon juice and most of the basil.
Divide pasta among bowls and top with more Parmesan and Aleppo-style pepper and remaining basil.

LINK: SESAME, CILANTRO, AND ROASTED FENNEL RICE BOWL

Ingredients

1/3 cup short-grain brown rice
1 tbsp apple cider vinegar
1 tbsp tamari
salt to taste
1 fennel bulb
2 red bell peppers
olive oil (as desired)
2 to 4 tbsp cilantro
1 avocado
2 tbsp sesame seeds

Dressing

4 garlic cloves unpeeled
3 tbsp olive oil
2 tsp apple cider vinegar
1 tsp tamari

Directions

Cook the brown rice in 1 cup water with the vinegar, tamari and salt to taste. This should take about 40 minutes.
Preheat the oven to 400°F.
Slice the fennel lengthwise. Cut each pepper into about 8 pieces. Place them on a baking sheet, drizzle with olive oil and sprinkle with salt. Bake for 15–20 minutes, until the edges are browning. For the last 10 minutes, add the garlic cloves (they will be used in the dressing).
Let the rice, vegetables and garlic cool.
Finely chop the cilantro. Cut the avocado into bite-size chunks. Roughly chop the roast vegetables and stir into the rice, with the avocado and sesame seeds.
Make the dressing. Peel the garlic and mash with a fork (it should be really soft). Mix in all the other ingredients. Stir into the rice and sprinkle with the cilantro.

Check out the Farm Store!

The best days to come to the farm store are Thursday morning through Sunday! We try to keep it stocked earlier in the week, but the largest variety comes over the weekend.

We’ll have corn for the month of August! Eggs, veggies, milk, treats, and more!

Weekly Update 8/1

On the Farm

Getting the newsletter out pretty late tonight, so I’m keeping it short.

I took a rare summer vacation at the end of last week to visit my parents, sisters, and niece and nephews over the weekend. It was good to get away for a couple days, but boy does the farm change a lot in four days. I’m still getting reacquainted with the fields after a long walk at dusk last night and working in them today. There are a lot of beds to check in on, and getting my head around what is happening where takes time. As I’ve always said, the farm is an ever changing landscape, and the plants wait for no one. Plus the rest of the farmers kept farming, and did a great job!

This week we will be W-E-E-D-I-N-G cause what else do veggie farmers do. Lots of things, actually, but they all come second to giving the crops room to grow. We’ll also be trellising cherry tomatoes in the greenhouse, fertilizing long season crops, and seeding for the fall. Hope everyone has a great week!

SUMMER SHARES WEEK 8!

A reminder that we are on the even week schedule for half shares. FULL SHARES receive a basket every week. HALF SHARES receive a basket every other week.

EVEN WEEKS

Week 2 – 6/22 Week 10 – 8/17
Week 4 – 7/6 Week 12 – 8/31
Week 6 – 7/20 Week 14 – 9/14
Week 8 – 8/3 Week 16 – 9/28

ODD WEEKS

Week 1 – 6/15 Week 9 – 8/10
Week 3 – 6/29 Week 11 – 8/24
Week 5 – 7/13 Week 13 – 9/7
Week 7 – 7/27 Week 15 – 9/21

BLUEBERRY SHARES! We will have blueberries out tomorrow for members who signed up for the berry share! Since blueberry season can be short, we’re gonna try and give everyone as many as possible in the first couple weeks. This week members will get double what ever they signed up for. In the barn will be a list with your name and the number of blueberry pints you should take home. Please check the list!

There is plenty of variety as we move in to the heart of the summer season. Basil is back in shares as a fresh herb this week. We are hoping to give big bunches for pesto making! Carrots are in shares and hope to stay that way for the next few weeks. Cauliflower replaces broccoli this week. The heat has been a real downer on the brassicas. The cauliflower will have a yellow tint to it. Totally fine and shouldn’t affect its use. It is a reaction to being exposed to light. Cucumbers are a weekly item. Fennel is new this week! The bulbs didn’t size up exactly how we would have liked, but they are still tasty. Flowers! We are overrun with snap dragons and will be including some in everyones share this week. Garlic is a staple. Greens Mix is some type of brassica based salad mix. We’ve struggled with our lettuce mix so far this year. I will be changing fields and see if that has an impact. Kale as a leafy green. This is kind of to replace lettuce heads which will be out of shares for at least a couple weeks while we wait for the heat of summer to pass. Onions. Can’t really call them green anymore. Fresh? They’ll have the tops lopped off this week. They’re just regular onions that haven’t fully cured yet. Peppers are starting to pick up production in the field. Squash and Zukes are a staple for a few more weeks. Tomatoes had a little bit of a false start. Some of the fruit started to turn red, but the bulk of it is still green and sizing up. There will be some tomatoes in shares, but the heavy season is still a couple weeks away.

Check for recipes below!

Shares Week 8:
Basil
Carrots
Cauliflower
Cucumbers
Fennel
Flowers!
Garlic
Greens Mix
Kale
Onions
Peppers
Summer Squash and Zucchini
Tomatoes of some variety

Egg Share: CHECK LIST FOR NAME
Bread Share: Maple Oat CHECK LIST FOR NAME

LINK: PASTA SALAD WITH FENNEL GREEN GODDESS DRESSING

This recipe is the reason why I started growing fennel on the farm. One of my favorite summer pasta recipes. The New York Times has the original recipe I used. Unfortunately it is pay-walled, but this recipe seems like a good alternative.

Ingredients

16 ounces of pasta of choice (453 grams)
1 cup vegan sour cream
1 cup packed basil leaves
¼ cup parsley
¼ cup fennel fronds (or fresh dill weed)
2 cloves garlic
6 scallions, white and green parts
2 tablespoons of lemon juice
1 cup of sliced fennel bulb (keep ¼ of the fonds)
1 cup arugula (rocket)
1 cup sugar snap peas (cut into bite-sized pieces)

Directions

Cook the pasta. Begin by heating a large pot of water. When it reaches a boil, add the pasta. Taste it to check for doneness. Once it’s tender yet firm, immediately drain it and rinse it with cool water to keep it from sticking.
Blend the dressing ingredients. Add vegan sour cream, basil, parsley, fennel fonds, garlic, 3 scallions, and lemon juice to a food processor or blender. Combine the ingredients until smooth. Add more lemon juice or water if you want to make it thinner.
Finish the salad. Mix the dressing and pasta in a large bowl, then add the sliced fennel, arugula, and sugar snap peas. Adjust the flavors. Add salt and black pepper if desired. If the salad starts to cease (dry out), add a few tablespoons of lemon juice to freshen it up.

LINK: KALE AND FENNEL SKILLET

Ingredients

2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
1 small onion, thinly sliced
1 small fennel bulb, thinly sliced
1/2 pound fully cooked apple chicken sausage links or cooked Italian sausage links, halved lengthwise and sliced into half-moons
2 garlic cloves, minced
3 tablespoons dry sherry or dry white wine
1 tablespoon herbes de Provence
1/8 teaspoon salt
1/8 teaspoon pepper
1 bunch kale, trimmed and torn into bite-sized pieces

Directions

In a large cast-iron or other heavy skillet, heat olive oil over medium-high heat. Add onion and fennel; cook and stir until onion begins to brown, 6-8 minutes. Add sausage, garlic, sherry and seasonings; cook until sausage starts to caramelize, 4-6 minutes.
Add kale; cook, covered, stirring occasionally, until kale is tender, 15-17 minutes.

LINK: ZUCCHINI FRITTERS

Gonna keep this one up for folks! A member emailed letting me know she follows a similar recipe, but freezes them the be enjoyed through the winter!

Ingredients

1 ½ pounds zucchini, grated
¾ teaspoon salt
¼ cup all-purpose flour
¼ cup grated Parmesan cheese
1 large egg, beaten
2 cloves garlic, minced
kosher salt and ground black pepper to taste
2 tablespoons olive oil

Directions

Toss zucchini and salt together in a large colander and place in sink to drain for 10 minutes.
Transfer zucchini to the center of a piece of cheesecloth; wrap cheesecloth around zucchini and squeeze to drain as much moisture as possible.
Mix flour, Parmesan cheese, egg, and garlic together in a large bowl. Stir in zucchini, then season with kosher salt and pepper.
Heat olive oil in a large skillet over medium-high heat.
Working in batches, scoop tablespoonfuls of zucchini mixture into the hot skillet and fry until golden brown, about 2 minutes per side.

Weekly Update 7/25

lettuce Mix

On the Farm

We’re starting to get used to these Monday morning thunderstorms. I think we’ve had three so far this year. We start harvest for the week on Monday and all morning long we were surrounded by distant, rolling thunder. The storms missed us for the most part during the day and the bulk of the rain came last night for us. But boy is it still dry in the fields! This might be the driest I’ve ever seen the farm, even after all the rain over the last week. We dug new potatoes this afternoon and the soil was STILL DRY just two inches down. The flipped over bed looked like the rainstorm missed it. It goes to show how bad we needed it to rain. I mentioned last week that we would need a few more storms to saturate the soil again, and it looks like we still need a few more.

All that being said, I prefer farming in a dry year on our fields. Our soil is a sandy loam, but it still holds a lot of water during a wet year. We also sit on a fairly high water table. I didn’t realize it until I was planting some fruit trees a few years ago, but about a foot and a half down the water started to pool in the tree hole. That’s all dependent on the rainfall, but it goes to show what the opposite can be on the farm. Over the years I have tried to cut these areas out of the growing space, but standing water in certain parts of fields is not uncommon. Because our soil holds water so well, dry years tend to be easier on the plants. We’ve had opportune rains this year. Usually enough to keep crops growing when they needed it, but not so much that we’re seeing water in the fields.

We pulled our garlic last week! nearly 8,000 bulbs with some help from a few CSA members. One of our farmers, Tiffany, made a garlic themed lunch with pizza and soup. A big thank you to everyone who showed up to lend a hand. I love getting to work with our members!

Now the garlic will sit on benches in our greenhouse to cure for a couple weeks before we start cleaning and sorting it into share garlic and garlic for replanting. The farm kinda stinks right now because of it. We lop the tops off before curing and the stalks in the compost pile have been wafting across the fields.I love the smell of garlic, but not so much when it has been sitting in the sun decomposing for a couple days.

Other than that its harvest and weeding on the farm, with a few other maintenance tasks mixed in throughout the week. We’ll plant another round of broccoli and fennel this week to break up some of the weeding. At least the heat wave has passed. Our crew did a great job over the last week!

IMG 8126 2

Turkeys in Need of Rehoming!

A couple of community members recently lost their home in a fire, and are now looking for someone to take the turkeys they have been raising. Due to the lack of water/electricity at their current property they are no longer able to adequately care for the turkeys.

In need of a new home are:

8 Mature turkeys (4 of each sex) born March 26th are around 15lbs and could be processed anytime now.

6 young turkeys (3 of each sex) 5 weeks old.

Please text or call Tiffany if you are able to take these turkeys (no cost).

603-831-9409

SUMMER SHARES WEEK 7!

A reminder that we are on the even week schedule for half shares. FULL SHARES receive a basket every week. HALF SHARES receive a basket every other week.

EVEN WEEKS

Week 2 – 6/22 Week 10 – 8/17
Week 4 – 7/6 Week 12 – 8/31
Week 6 – 7/20 Week 14 – 9/14
Week 8 – 8/3 Week 16 – 9/28

ODD WEEKS

Week 1 – 6/15 Week 9 – 8/10
Week 3 – 6/29 Week 11 – 8/24
Week 5 – 7/13 Week 13 – 9/7
Week 7 – 7/27 Week 15 – 9/21

BLUEBERRY SHARES! We will have blueberries out tomorrow for members who signed up for the berry share! Since blueberry season can be short, we’re gonna try and give everyone as many as possible in the first couple weeks. This week members will get double what ever they signed up for. In the barn will be a list with your name and the number of blueberry pints you should take home. Please check the list!

Baskets will look similar but different this week. Arugula has been a steady salad green for us so far this season. Broccoli is going into shares! It got away from us in the heat a little bit over the weekend 😦 so the heads aren’t the well rounded domes you are used to, but it is still good for cooking with! Carrots are making their debut. They are slender, but perfect for roasting whole. See the recipe below. Cukes are mainstays for the foreseeable future. Head Lettuce somehow made it through the heatwave without bolting this week. We’ll see about next week. Garlic is going to be a weekly staple for the remainder of the season. Green Onions are back in shares. Parsley is the fresh herb for the week. Potatoes will be in shares one more time until the fall. Nightshades are coming! They will be slow to start, but everyone’s favorite crops are coming in to maturity. This week all baskets will see either peppers or tomatoes until the plants pick up production. Summer Squash and Zucchini exploded in the field with the heat over the weekend. Seriously, it’s like they had a party out there. They will be on the bigger side this week until we get a handle on the new beds.

Check for recipes below!

Shares Week 7:
Arugula
Broccoli
Carrots
Cucumbers
Head Lettuce
Garlic
Green Onions
Parsley
Potatoes
Peppers or Tomatoes
Summer Squash and Zucchini

Egg Share: CHECK LIST FOR NAME
Bread Share: Onion Pepper Parmesan CHECK LIST FOR NAME

LINK: ZUCCHINI FRITTERS

Ingredients

1 ½ pounds zucchini, grated
¾ teaspoon salt
¼ cup all-purpose flour
¼ cup grated Parmesan cheese
1 large egg, beaten
2 cloves garlic, minced
kosher salt and ground black pepper to taste
2 tablespoons olive oil

Directions

Toss zucchini and salt together in a large colander and place in sink to drain for 10 minutes.
Transfer zucchini to the center of a piece of cheesecloth; wrap cheesecloth around zucchini and squeeze to drain as much moisture as possible.
Mix flour, Parmesan cheese, egg, and garlic together in a large bowl. Stir in zucchini, then season with kosher salt and pepper.
Heat olive oil in a large skillet over medium-high heat.
Working in batches, scoop tablespoonfuls of zucchini mixture into the hot skillet and fry until golden brown, about 2 minutes per side.

LINK: POTATO SALAD WITH ARUGULA AND DIJON VINAIGRETTE

Ingredients

1/2 small red onion, peeled and roughly chopped
2 pounds new potatoes, scrubbed and cut into bite-sized pieces
Salt
1 tablespoon rice vinegar
Freshly ground black pepper
2 tablespoons finely chopped chives
3 cups arugula, stems removed, washed and dried and very roughly chopped
2 tablespoons red wine vinegar
1 tablespoon Dijon mustard
5 tablespoons good olive oil

Directions

Put the onion in a small bowl and cover with cold water (this will remove some of the bite). Put the potatoes in a large pot of generously salted water. Bring to a boil over high heat.
Lower the heat so the water is barely simmering and cook for about 10 minutes, until you can pierce the potatoes with the tip of a sharp knife and it slips out easily. Drain the potatoes well and pour them into a large bowl.
Gently toss the warm potatoes with the rice vinegar, 1/4 teaspoon salt, and 1/2 teaspoon pepper. Add the chives, arugula and red onion and stir through.
Whisk together the red wine vinegar, mustard and olive oil in a small bowl. Add salt and pepper to taste. Pour over the potato mixture and toss to combine. Serve warm or keep covered at room temperature for up to an hour.

LINK: ROASTED CARROTS

Ingredients

2 pounds carrots, peeled quartered or cut into sixths lengthwise depending on the size, then into 2-inch lengths
3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
Salt
freshly ground pepper
1 teaspoon fresh thyme leaves, chopped
½ teaspoon oregano
3 tablespoons finely chopped flat-leaf parsley

Directions

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees. Oil a sheet pan or a baking dish large enough to fit all of the carrots in a single layer. Place the carrots in a large bowl, and toss with the olive oil, salt, pepper, thyme and oregano.
Spread in an even layer in the prepared pan or baking dish. Cover with foil, and place in the oven for 30 minutes. Uncover, and if the carrots are not yet tender, turn the heat down to 375 degrees and return to the oven for 10 to 15 more minutes until tender. Add the parsley, stir gently, and taste and adjust salt and pepper. Serve hot, warm or at room temperature.
Dahlia 50% EVERYTHING IN THE PLANT STAND! It’s all going on sale! We want to shutter the stand until mums in the fall, so help take the rest of the plants, window boxes, and hanging baskets off our hands! Everything will be marked down 50% and there are still some really nice baskets and boxes out there. Particularly the begonia hanging baskets.

Weekly Newsletter 7/11/22

lettuce Mix

On the Farm

The farm keeps humming along as the summer starts to settle in. Today and tonight have been gorgeous. There’s nothing like a still evening after a long summers day. It reminds of something out of a novel.

On the farm we have been weeding. And we’re going to continue weeding. It never ends! At least we have freed up some time by not having a laundry list of crops to get in the ground. Our summer crops are for the most part in, and now we can start looking towards planting for the fall. Last week we seeded some trays of lettuce, cabbage, and broccoli in our greenhouse for planting out in a few weeks. While we don’t have to plant as often, now we have to flip beds to get them ready to be planted in. The farm is an ever changing landscape, and few things stay in place for long.

Aside from planting and weeding, the plants we have in the ground are looking big and healthy. Tomatoes are coming right along. They are in the fields in front of the greenhouse and we will be taking them out from under their row cover in the coming week. I’ve been peaking below regularly to see where there at, but never get a big picture look until we uncover them. Peppers and eggplant will be unveiled, as well.
Lots more crops are coming into their own. Broccoli is starting to button, beets are bulging in the soil, and the carrots are just long slender tap roots waiting to expand outward. More on what to expect this week below.
Share week 6

SUMMER SHARES WEEK 5!

A reminder that we are on the even week schedule for half shares. FULL SHARES receive a basket every week. HALF SHARES receive a basket every other week.

EVEN WEEKS

Week 2 – 6/22 Week 10 – 8/17
Week 4 – 7/6 Week 12 – 8/31
Week 6 – 7/20 Week 14 – 9/14
Week 8 – 8/3 Week 16 – 9/28

ODD WEEKS

Week 1 – 6/15 Week 9 – 8/10
Week 3 – 6/29 Week 11 – 8/24
Week 5 – 7/13 Week 13 – 9/7
Week 7 – 7/27 Week 15 – 9/21

We are right on the precipice of full summer shares, and baskets are growing each week. We’re gonna skip the kale and chard this week after everyone has gotten plenty the first four weeks. We’ll be rotating it through shares as the season progresses.

In shares this week is Arugula. It is baby sized and delicious. Everyone should get a nice, big bag. Basil will be the herb this week! Head Lettuce ought to be a regular. Garlic! We’ll be pulling up some green garlic to put in shares this week. It can be used the same way you use dried garlic, but it has a shorter shelf life. We’re gonna clear out the rest of our Napa cabbage for shares this week. It is not fully headed up, but still has plenty of good wrapper leaves. Radishes will be back in shares. Summer Squash is in abundance right now and will be in all baskets. Everyone will get either a Cucumber or Zucchini. We’re just waiting for the beds to start producing in earnest, then they should be in all baskets.

Check for recipes below!

QUICK NOTE: Blueberry shares will be starting next week! We have a few blueberries that will go in to the store this week, but don’t have enough for all of shares yet!

Shares Week 5:
Arugula
Basil
Head Lettuce
Garlic
Napa Cabbage
Radishes
Summer Squash
Cucumbers or Zucchini

Egg Share: CHECK LIST FOR NAME
Bread Share: Honey Multigrain CHECK LIST FOR NAME

LINK: SUMMER SQUASH AND BASIL PASTA

Gonna have two recipes for you this week! First will be for using your napa cabbage, and the second is a great main dish to go with the cabbage!

Ingredients

¼ cup olive oil
8 garlic cloves, thinly sliced
2 pounds assorted summer squashes and zucchini, quartered lengthwise, sliced
Kosher salt
1 teaspoon Aleppo-style pepper, plus more for serving
12 ounces paccheri, ziti, or other large tube pasta
2ounces Parmesan, grated (about ½ cup), plus more for serving
1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
½ cup basil leaves, divided

Directions

Step 1

Heat oil in a large skillet over medium. Cook garlic, stirring occasionally, until very lightly browned around the edges, about 4 minutes. Add squash and increase heat to medium high; season with salt. Cook, tossing occasionally, until squash begins to break down. Turn down heat once it begins sticking, and continue to cook until the squash is jammy and soft, 12–15 minutes. Toss in 1 tsp. Aleppo-style pepper.
Step 2

Meanwhile, cook pasta in a large pot of boiling salted water, stirring occasionally, until very al dente.
Step 3

Transfer pasta to skillet with squash using a slotted spoon or spider and add ½ cup pasta cooking liquid. Cook pasta, adding 2 oz. Parmesan in stages along with more pasta cooking liquid as needed, until sauce coats pasta and pasta is al dente. Toss in lemon juice and most of the basil.
Step 4

Divide pasta among bowls and top with more Parmesan and Aleppo-style pepper and remaining basil.

LINK: NAPA CABBAGE AND RADISH SLAW

Ingredients

1 small head Napa cabbage, thinly sliced then coarsely chopped (see notes)
1 C thinly and diagonally-sliced sugar snap peas
1 C radishes, sliced into half-moon shapes
1/2 cup sliced green onion
1/2 cup chopped cilantro (see notes)
1/2 cup sliced almonds, toasted

Dressing Ingredients:

1 T white wine vinegar or white balsamic vinegar
1 T Golden Monkfruit Sweetener, or sweetener of your choice (see notes)
1 tsp. soy sauce or Gluten-Free Soy Sauce (see notes)
1/2 tsp. crushed garlic puree or minced garlic
1/4 tsp. Asian sesame oil
1/4 tsp. ground ginger puree or minced ginger
1/4 tsp. Sriracha sauce or other hot sauce (more or less to taste)
1/3 cup mayo

Directions

Thinly slice Napa cabbage, then coarsely chop to make about 4 cups shredded cabbage.
Trim both ends of sugar snap peas, then thinly slice on the diagonal to make 1 cup sliced peas.
Trim both ends of radishes and wash if needed, then cut in half lengthwise and cut into half-moon slices.
Slice green onions to make 1/2 cup.
If using cilantro, wash, spin dry or dry with paper towels, and then chop enough to make 1/2 cup chopped cilantro, or a bit more won’t hurt.
Put Napa cabbage, sugar snap peas, radishes, green onions (and cilantro if using) into salad bowl.
In a bowl or glass measuring cup stir together the white wine vinegar, sweetener, soy sauce, garlic puree, sesame oil, ginger puree, and Sriracha sauce (affiliate link). I recommend doubling the dressing; it is good on so many things!
Whisk in the mayo until ingredients are well combined.
Toss salad ingredients, add enough dressing to coat ingredients, and toss again.
Toast the sliced almonds in a dry pan over high heat for 1-2 minutes (just until the nuts are fragrant).
Add almonds to the salad and toss gently.
Serve immediately. At my house this never lasts long enough to know whether it will keep in the refrigerator!
Store fridge 2

Check out the Farm Store!

Plenty of veggies in the store this week! Plus a big order coming in to restock the off farm goods. Come check us out!

Plus eggs, ice cream, chocolate milk, pudding, kimchi and saurkraut, and honey, as well!

Fall VEggies

Fall Shares!

Still quite a ways out, but it doesn’t hurt to plan ahead, and the fall share helps you plan through the winter. Plenty of potatoes, sweet potatoes, garlic, carrots, winter squash, and more to last you well into January and potentially beyond.

First Week of July on the Farm

On the Farm

Another busy week on the farm! We’ve finally got to the point where we can focus primarily on maintaining crops in the ground rather than constantly planting. It is a relief, that’s for sure.

Our greenhouses were fully trellised last week. We do tomatoes and cucumbers in the tunnels and hang them from the supports using twine. It’s pretty cool to see, in my opinion. Anyone is welcome to poke their head in and check it out if you want. Joe has been our main tomato trelliser this year and has been holding it down in the greenhouses. I worked on the cukes most of that day. Cuke season is finally upon us! I’m a little worried about how our plants will do this year. We have an infestation of cucumber beetles. I’ve increased fertility in the cucurbits to try and fend them off as long as possible. Cucumber beetles transmit a disease called bacterial wilt which slowly wilts the plant from the bottom up. A lot of farms have started using an insect netting in their high tunnels to keep cuke beetles out instead of spraying. Netting is likely in our future based on what I’m seeing this year.

Talkin’ about pests, the deer have been relentless this year. We’ve seen steadily increasing deer pressure over the past few years. My main deterrent is using row cover on anything the deer like to keep them away. The problem is that is makes it really hot under the row cover, so cooler weather plants don’t like it as much. Unfortunately the deer love those plants! Like lettuce! I just had to cover some lettuce beds today because I started to see that the deer were nibbling on them. There is always some trade off no matter what we do. Hopefully the row cover will do more to deter the deer than it does to hinder the lettuce.

We started picking raspberries last week! and they are SO delicious! The crew loves picking raspberries and everyone leaves with a belly ache at the end after eating too many berries. It’s hard not to eat too many when picking when there seem to be limitless berries in front of you. Next week I’m expecting blueberries to start coming in.

SUMMER SHARES WEEK 4!

A reminder that we are on the even week schedule for half shares. FULL SHARES receive a basket every week. HALF SHARES receive a basket every other week.

EVEN WEEKS

Week 2 – 6/22 Week 10 – 8/17
Week 4 – 7/6 Week 12 – 8/31
Week 6 – 7/20 Week 14 – 9/14
Week 8 – 8/3 Week 16 – 9/28

ODD WEEKS

Week 1 – 6/15 Week 9 – 8/10
Week 3 – 6/29 Week 11 – 8/24
Week 5 – 7/13 Week 13 – 9/7
Week 7 – 7/27 Week 15 – 9/21

We’re gonna start seeing cucurbits in shares this week and then hopefully for the rest of the summer! Depending on what the harvest looks like on Wednesday, there will be either cukes, summer squash, or Zucchini in shares this week. With a little rain you might get all three. Chard and Kale are both in shares again this week. I don’t like giving out these greens over and over again throughout the season, but it in the earlier weeks I am passing out everything that is available. Head Lettuce will finally be in shares this week! We had to get through some earlier beds that did not produce well for us. Napa Cabbage with a recipe below! and Sage with another recipe below!

We’ll be doing another round of coupons this week !:
In shares are coupons for Nuttin Ordinary dairy free cheese that can be used in our farm store! This is a local business run by Josh Velasquez and Adam Hamilton out of Peterborough, NH. We crossed paths at the Hannah Grimes Center, and they offered coupons for our members to try their cheese spreads!

Shares Week 4:
Cucumbers, Zukes, or Squash
Chard
Head Lettuce
Kale
Napa Cabbage
Sage

Egg Share: CHECK LIST FOR NAME
Bread Share: Honey Multigrain CHECK LIST FOR NAME

LINK: STIR FRY NAPA CABBAGE W/ SPICY GARLIC DRESSING

Gonna have two recipes for you this week! First will be for using your napa cabbage, and the second is a great main dish to go with the cabbage!

Ingredients

4 cloves garlic—two chopped and two minced
Kosher salt
4 scallions, finely chopped
3 tablespoons soy sauce
1 tablespoon Asian sesame oil
1 tablespoon water
1 teaspoon coarse Korean hot red-pepper flakes
1/2 teaspoon sugar
1 tablespoon vegetable oil
One 1 1/2-pound head Napa cabbage, thinly sliced
2 teaspoons toasted sesame seeds, toasted

Directions

Step 1

Mince and mash the chopped garlic to a paste with a pinch of salt. Stir together the scallions, minced garlic, soy sauce, sesame oil, water, hot red-pepper flakes and sugar together in a small bowl. Set aside.

Step 2

Heat the oil in a wok or large skillet over high heat. Add the cabbage, season with a pinch of salt, and stir-fry, using tongs to stir, until the cabbage is just wilted, 3 to 5 minutes. Remove from the heat and pour the dressing over the cabbage and toss gently to combine. Transfer to a serving dish and garnish with the toasted sesame seeds.

LINK: SAGE PORK CHOPS

Second recipe because we are passing out sage bunches to everyone on Wednesday, and I already know that I will be using it with my Archway Farm CSA share!

4 boneless pork loin chops (6 ounces each)
Coarse salt and ground pepper
1 tablespoon olive oil
1 tablespoon butter
1 medium shallot, minced
1 teaspoon chopped fresh sage or 1/4 teaspoon dried
1/4 teaspoon dried thyme leaves
1/2 cup dry white wine

Step 1

Season pork generously with salt and pepper. In a large skillet, heat oil and butter over medium; add pork. Cook until browned and opaque throughout, 3 to 4 minutes per side. Transfer to a plate, and cover loosely with aluminum foil to keep warm.
Step 2

Make sauce: Add shallot to skillet; cook over medium, stirring until softened, 1 to 2 minutes. Add sage, thyme, and wine. Simmer until sauce is reduced to about 1/3 cup, 2 to 3 minutes; stir in any accumulated juices from plate with meat. Transfer chops to plates, drizzle with sauce, and serve with Parmesan Rice.

More Complaints About the Weather!

Dahlia Starts in the Greenhouse

On the Farm

Good evening, all!

Have you ever noticed that farmers are never happy with the weather forecast? I have to remind myself every year. After weeks of hoping it would dry out, we are finally getting our wish. But now there is no rain in the forecast for at least a week! That’s not good, either!

At least for the time being we are taking advantage of the dryness and prepping the fields that are ready to be planted in. We’ve made beds in about half the fields at this point, and will be planting in them this week. We’re not set up to irrigate the fields, which can be a struggle during dry periods. If the forecast holds, we’ll be out with a maple syrup collection bin in the back of a track connected to a hose. Not ideal, but necessary after dealing with dry springs for the last couple of years.

Everything is starting to feel awfully busy around here. This is one of the most difficult parts of the year to manage time on the farm. We are racing to get crops in to the ground on time, while also making sure we have time to seed in our propagation house. We’re basically trying to do two top priorities at once.

We’ll keep working on getting veggies in to the ground and seeded into trays through out the week. Shares are looking good for this week, the store has been stocked with lots of greens, and we will be starting up at the Keene Farmer’s Market this Saturday! Hope to see everyone soon!

Crowd Funding for the Monadnock Mobile Food Pantry

KICKOFF for the “Local’s Local Fund”; the fund benefiting The Community Kitchen’s Monadnock Mobile Food Pantry starts THIS WEEK! By purchasing local food and products from Monadnock farms for distribution at 6 locations throughout the region this summer, we are bringing “fresh” and “local” to all community members! Our goal for summer 2022 is to raise $5000.

Will You Help Provide Equitable Access to Local Food?

As a member of the board for the Monadnock Farm and Community Coalition, I have been privy to the conversations surrounding the launch of the Monadnock Mobile Food Pantry. This project is close to me and to Tracie’s Farm, and I am asking our members to pitch in to help get it off the ground. By launching a mobile food pantry, more communities will have equitable access to food security resources. Our region is lucky to have an active network of food pantries, but not all towns are properly represented. A mobile pantry is able to access those towns that do not have the same resources, and help bring local food to the under served.

This project helps bolster our community two fold. The money raised through the locals local fund will help pay farmers competitive prices for the produce they work hard for. Caring for one another and supporting local establishments are tantamount to building community, and your donation can help with both.

Crowdfunding campaigns are most succesful when they are able to raise 30% of their goal in the first three weeks. We are trying to raise $1500 by May 20th from our community members. We are at $468 currently. When we hit this goal, our fund will be launched on a crowdfunding campaign (The Local Crowd Monadnock) to reach our overall goal of $5000.

Could you please help me reach our $1500 goal by May 20th by donating today? Any amount will help us reach our goal! I can’t thank you enough for your help and support.

Jack Rixey and the Crew at Tracie’s farm.

HERE IS DONATION LINK

Store Stocked Wednesdays! Plant Stand is Open!

The store has plenty of greens available every Wednesday after 3:30pm. We’ve been having a great spinach year, radishes have consistently been available, and the microgreens are delicious. Eggs, milk, bread, ice ream, and other local goods are available.

The stand is still small, but we are stocking it every Monday and Friday. For now it is mostly lettuce, brassicas, onions, and some cold hardy flowers. We plan to put frost sensitive crops out towards the end of May. Most likely Memorial day, maybe a week earlier if the weather looks favorable. That will include all of our tomatoes, basil, peppers, dahlias, geraniums, begonias, squash, cucumbers, and more!

SPRING SHARES WEEK 9

Wow it feels like a completely different share this week. Lots of salad greens reaching maturity in the high tunnels. Baby Kale is making its first appearance. Brassica Mix, Claytonia, and Radishes are back in the fold. There will be a little Mint in everyone’s basket. I’m seeing a mint based dressing in my future. Spinach and Bok Choy are the staples.

We’re retiring turnips and micro greens from shares, but will keep them in the store for anyone that still wants them. I just ate a turnip for a snack today. It was phenomenal.

Shares Week 8:
Baby Kale
Bok Choy
Brassica Mix
Claytonia
Mint
Radishes
Spinach

Egg Share: 12 + 6 Week Share
Bread Share: Maple Oat

LINK: Fresh Mint Dressing

This on top of the bok choy salad from last week sounds delicious.

Ingredients

½ cup extra-virgin olive oil

½ cup lemon juice (about 2 lemons)

¼ cup packed fresh mint (spearmint) leaves (about half of a ⅔ or ¾-ounce package)

3 tablespoons honey or maple syrup

1 tablespoon Dijon mustard

2 cloves garlic, roughly chopped

¼ teaspoon fine sea salt

10 twists of freshly ground black pepper

Instructions

In a food processor, combine all of the ingredients and blend until smooth. Taste, and add more salt and/or pepper if necessary. Use as desired!

This dressing will keep well, covered and refrigerated, for up to 1 week.

Summer CSA Shares!

Summer Shares are available! Right now we are at about 85% sold on shares, and orders keep coming in every day.

We have a 16 week full share or an 8 week half share available. The full share gets a basket every week, and the half share gets one every other week. They feature staples and as well as lesser known varieties. In total we grow about 30 unique veggies for the summer season!

Home delivery is available in 11 towns. Dublin, Fitzwilliam, Harrisville, Jaffrey, Keene, Marlborough, Nelson, Peterborough, Rindge, Swanzey, and Winchendon.

Flexible payment plans so you don’t have to pay all at once.

Accepting Members through the Monadnock Farm Share Program!

The Monadnock Farm Share program makes farm shares more accessible for community members who otherwise would not be able to participate in a local community supported agriculture (CSA) program. CSA programs are an opportunity for community members to enjoy farm fresh produce, while supporting local agriculture! Through the program, community members pay 50% of the total farm share cost.

This year, the Cheshire County Conservation District (CCCD) has received additional funding for farm shares for local BIPOC (Black, Indigenous, and People of Color) families. We are working to expand accessibility and awareness of this program, any assistance in spreading the word is greatly appreciated!

This year’s applications are due by May 1, 2022, and will be reviewed on a rolling basis (first come, first served). Community members choose from a listing of participating farms throughout the region, including Tracie’s Community Farm!

To access this year’s application, participating farm list, and for more information visit: https://cheshireconservation.org/farmshare

Workshare!

Don’t have the time to commit to an entire season? The workshare position is perfect for folks that want to spend a day out of the week working and learning on a farm! We love having workshares on the farm because it is an opportunity to meet members in the community. The farm feels more alive with lots of people around. Workshares fill a wide variety of roles on the farm.

Lunch Prep
Farmers Market
Harvest
Weeding
Wash/Pack
Field
& Delivery Drivers!

In exchange for working seven hours per week on the farm, workshares are fed lunch on their workday and receive a weekly basket of produce with the bread and egg options included. Typically those hours are completed in one day, with the exception of the lunch prep workshare.

If you are interested in a workshare position, please call or email Jack:

443-994-4629 — Farmers@traciesfarm

Fall Shares!

Still quite a ways out, but it doesn’t hurt to plan ahead, and the fall share helps you plan through the winter. Plenty of potatoes, sweet potatoes, garlic, carrots, winter squash, and more to last you well into January and potentially beyond.

Dahlia Starts in the Greenhouse

On the Farm

Good evening!

If anyone follows our social media, you will know that we officially broke ground on the 2022 summer season! Those windy days really dried out the fields in a hurry, and now it is off to the races as we try to put everything in the ground as fast as we can. The crew had a killer week last week and we pulled probably a million pounds of rocks out of the field. That made it possible to go through with our tractor and start prepping the ground for planting! I tilled and made beds this weekend, and this morning the farmers laid biodegradable plastic over our future onion beds.

Getting out in the fields has been a blast, especially considering how beautiful it was these past couple of days, but we are still flat out in the propagation greenhouse prepping for the summer. Last week we potted up around 500 tomato plants to be put in the stand. We will have over 18 varieties of heirloom, hybrid, and cherry tomatoes available. They look beautiful in their pots right now.

It feels like the season begins in earnest now that we broke ground. Admittedly my newsletters get a little shorter each week as the season rolls on. Read on to learn more about what’s going on at the farm!

Store Stocked Wednesdays! Plant Stand is Open!

The store has plenty of greens available every Wednesday after 3:30pm. We’ve been having a great spinach year, radishes have consistently been available, and the microgreens have been delicious. Eggs, milk, bread, ice ream, and other local goods are available.

The stand is still small, but we are stocking it every Monday and Friday. For now it is mostly lettuce, brassicas, onions, and some cold hardy flowers. We plan to put frost sensitive crops out towards the end of May. Most likely Memorial day, maybe a week earlier if the weather looks favorable. That will include all of our tomatoes, basil, peppers, dahlias, geraniums, begonias, squash, cucumbers, and more!

SPRING SHARES WEEK 8

Bok Choy will see its first week in shares! One of Tracie’s favorite recipes for bok choy is a salad with crunchy ramen noodles on top. I’ll include one below. I can almost hear her now talking about how surprisingly good the salad is with the ramen on top!

Other than that it is pretty standard fare from the last few weeks. Lettuce Mix is back in shares. Radishes are out for a couple weeks, but we might have some for our store. Don’t forget to eat your turnip greens!

Shares Week 8:
Bok Choy
Cilantro
Lettuce Mix
Microgreens
Spinach
Turnips with greens
Tokyo Bekana

Egg Share: 12 Week Share Only
Bread Share: Cinnamon Raisin

Summer CSA Shares!

Summer Shares are available! Right now we are at about 80% sold on shares, and orders keep coming in every day.

We have a 16 week full share or an 8 week half share available. The full share gets a basket every week, and the half share gets one every other week. They feature staples and as well as lesser known varieties. In total we grow about 30 unique veggies for the summer season!

Home delivery is available in 11 towns. Dublin, Fitzwilliam, Harrisville, Jaffrey, Keene, Marlborough, Nelson, Peterborough, Rindge, Swanzey, and Winchendon.

Flexible payment plans so you don’t have to pay all at once.

Support A Local Food Pantry and Help Us Reach Our Goal!

We are selling CSA shares to be donated to one of our local food pantries in order to help raise funds for an infrastructure project in our washing and packing station. We have existing relationships with the Rindge Food Pantry, Jaffrey Food Pantry, Fitzwilliam District Nursing Association, and the Community Kitchen in Keene.

Members purchase a share of our produce just like our CSA, which is then used as a credit for produce to be sent to the pantry weekly. For example, a CSA share is approximately $41/week. That means that a a single share purchased for a local pantry could provide up to 16 heads of lettuce per week for 16 weeks–or 12 pounds of tomatoes, or 15 pounds of cucumbers.

The money from the shares sold would then go towards upgrading our washing and packing station in the barn in order to make sure that all of our produce is leaving the barn fresh, clean, and of the highest quality. We have already begun work on reinsulating our walk-in cooler so that our produce is held for optimum storage!

This is a great way to make an impact in the community. Pantries are always grateful for produce from the farm, and we have worked with many of them for years. We still plan to donate produce weekly to prevent waste on the farm, but this project would prioritize getting pantries a consistent supply of fresh vegetables. Each share will improve our farms viability, provide fresh produce to local food pantries, and help build a more resilient community. Donations are tax deductible.

Accepting Members through the Monadnock Farm Share Program!

The Monadnock Farm Share program makes farm shares more accessible for community members who otherwise would not be able to participate in a local community supported agriculture (CSA) program. CSA programs are an opportunity for community members to enjoy farm fresh produce, while supporting local agriculture! Through the program, community members pay 50% of the total farm share cost.

This year, the Cheshire County Conservation District (CCCD) has received additional funding for farm shares for local BIPOC (Black, Indigenous, and People of Color) families. We are working to expand accessibility and awareness of this program, any assistance in spreading the word is greatly appreciated!

This year’s applications are due by May 1, 2022, and will be reviewed on a rolling basis (first come, first served). Community members choose from a listing of participating farms throughout the region, including Tracie’s Community Farm!

To access this year’s application, participating farm list, and for more information visit:

LINk: Bok Choy Salad with Ramen

Ingredients

For the sesame dressing:

▢ 1/4 cup light brown sugar

▢ 1/4 cup olive oil

▢ 2 tablespoons red wine vinegar

▢ 2 tablespoons toasted sesame seeds (see notes)

▢ 1 tablespoon soy sauce

For the salad:

▢ 2 tablespoons olive oil

▢ 1 package ramen noodles crumbled, seasoning packet discarded (see notes for vegan information)

▢ 1/4 cup sliced almonds

▢ 1 bunch baby bok choy sliced (5 – 6 bulbs)

▢ 5 scallions chopped

Instructions

To make the dressing:

In a small bowl or in a jar with a tight-fitting lid, combine brown sugar, olive oil, vinegar, sesame seeds, and soy sauce. Allow flavors to blend at room temperature while preparing the rest of the salad.

To make the salad:

Heat olive oil in a large sauce pan over medium heat until shimmering. Reduce heat to low. Add ramen noodles and almonds; sauté until toasted, about 10 minutes, stirring frequently to avoid scorching.

In a large bowl, combine baby bok choy, scallions, and crunchy mix. Drizzle salad dressing over the top and toss until uniformly combined. Serve at room temperature.

Fall Shares!

Still quite a ways out, but it doesn’t hurt to plan ahead, and the fall share helps you plan through the winter. Plenty of potatoes, sweet potatoes, garlic, carrots, winter squash, and more to last you well into January and potentially beyond.

Workshare!

Don’t have the time to commit to an entire season? The workshare position is perfect for folks that want to spend a day out of the week working and learning on a farm! We love having workshares on the farm because it is an opportunity to meet members in the community. The farm feels more alive with lots of people around. Workshares fill a wide variety of roles on the farm.

Lunch Prep
Farmers Market
Harvest
Weeding
Wash/Pack
Field
& Delivery Drivers!

In exchange for working seven hours per week on the farm, workshares are fed lunch on their workday and receive a weekly basket of produce with the bread and egg options included. Typically those hours are completed in one day, with the exception of the lunch prep workshare.

If you are interested in a workshare position, please call or email Jack:

443-994-4629 — Farmers@traciesfarm

Dahlia Starts in the Greenhouse

On the Farm

Good evening!

It was an exciting day on the farm as all of our bee packages arrived for the season! In total we installed three hives. Bee packages are boxes of honey bees with a queen bee in a separate housing. The queen has to be kept separate because otherwise the workers would try to kill her! BUT, after a few days of sharing the hive with their new queen, the bees will eventually start to recognize her and remain loyal for the rest of their life. Bee keeping is fascinating and has been one of my favorite parts of farming. I’d love to harvest some honey one day, but as a beginning bee keeper, my main goal is to keep as many hives alive through the winter as possible.

Last week was our “catch-up” week on the farm. All of the projects that had been falling by the wayside were completed. Including finishing the rejuvenation of our raspberry patch! Every week we have a list of items that need to get done, and every week one or two things are gotten around to. Last week was all about finding those smaller tasks that we’ve been putting off.

While I was working on the bees, the crew worked on getting our pavilion set up for lunch season. We feed the crew lunch everyday through the summer(one of the best perks of the job, in my opinion), and opened up our outdoor kitchen for the first time this season. It’s always exciting, there have been a lot of fun and delicious lunches in the kitchen.

Farm Store and Plant Stand Now Open!

The store is stocked up with local milk, eggs, bread, cheese, and ice cream, as well as our veggies from the greenhouse! It’s looking pretty full for mid April!

The stand is modest, but still plenty of nice looking starts for early spring gardens. Lettuce, cabbage, onions, perennial herbs, and petunias. The full stand will be out by memorial day!

SPRING SHARES WEEK 7

A few more new items this week! Cilantro, Claytonia, and Tokyo Bekana are both going in to shares. I’m gonna give you all two recipes this week because 1.) I love radish salsa with cilantro and 2.) Nobody knows what Tokyo Bekana is.

Claytonia is a farm favorite salad green. We’re gonna hold off on the lettuce mix to let it grow for another week before putting it back in shares. Claytonia is a great substitution, if you ask me!

Shares Week 6:
Cilantro
Claytonia
Microgreens
Pea Shoots
Radishes
Spinach
Turnips with greens
Tokyo Bekana

Egg Share: 12 Week + 6 Week Share
Bread Share: Onion, Pepper, Parmesan

LINk: Radish Salsa

Ingredients For the Salsa

2 C radishes, finely chopped*
3/4 C jalapeños, seeded and small-diced
6 green onions, finely chopped
2 garlic cloves, minced
2 Tbsp cilantro, finely chopped
2 Tbsp lemon juice, freshly squeezed
1/4 tsp salt

Instructions For the Salsa

Prepare the salsa ingredients and place them in a medium-sized bowl. Mix until evenly combined.

Store in the refrigerator until you are ready to serve

LINK: Honey Ginger Greens

Ingredients for the Greens

4-6 cups chopped Asian greens
1/4 cup coconut aminos
2 tbsp raw honey
1 tsp arrowroot powder
1 tsp fresh minced or grated ginger

Instructions for the Greens


Add chopped greens to a pan with a just small dash or spray of avocado oil. Toss around to coat evenly in the small amount of oil and add salt to taste.
In a small dish, whisk together aminos, honey, arrowroot, and ginger until combined well.
Once greens start sizzle and have been tossed around while cooking for a minute – pour in your sauce mixture.
Toss around often and allow greens to cook a few minutes or to your desired tenderness.
Remove greens. You can use any excess sauce to pour over your greens and let them marinate in it OR use the extra sauce to pour over any protein you’re having with your greens.
Finish with red pepper flakes + sesame seeds if you wish!

Accepting Members through the Monadnock Farm Share Program!

The Monadnock Farm Share program makes farm shares more accessible for community members who otherwise would not be able to participate in a local community supported agriculture (CSA) program. CSA programs are an opportunity for community members to enjoy farm fresh produce, while supporting local agriculture! Through the program, community members pay 50% of the total farm share cost.

This year, the Cheshire County Conservation District (CCCD) has received additional funding for farm shares for local BIPOC (Black, Indigenous, and People of Color) families. We are working to expand accessibility and awareness of this program, any assistance in spreading the word is greatly appreciated!

This year’s applications are due by May 1, 2022, and will be reviewed on a rolling basis (first come, first served). Community members choose from a listing of participating farms throughout the region, including Tracie’s Community Farm!

To access this year’s application, participating farm list, and for more information visit: https://cheshireconservation.org/farmshare

Help Us Reach Our Goal!

Last week we presented to a group at the Hannah Grimes Center to help fund an infrastructure project on the farm to improve our food safety practices.

In order to raise funds for the project, we are selling an additional 10 CSA shares to be donated to a local food pantry or charitable organization. Money from the shares will go to purchasing stainless steel countertops to replace our wooden packing tables in the barn, upgrading our greens spinners so that they have a removable contact surface, and re-insulating our walk-in to improve efficiency and hold a more stable temperature.

If you would like to contribute to our project and to the community, please reach out as soon as possible. Our goal is to fund the project by May 1st.

Summer CSA Shares!

Summer Shares are available! Right now we are at about 80% sold on shares, and orders keep coming in every day.

We have a 16 week full share or an 8 week half share available. The full share gets a basket every week, and the half share gets one every other week. They feature staples and as well as lesser known varieties. In total we grow about 30 unique veggies for the summer season!

Home delivery is available in 11 towns. Dublin, Fitzwilliam, Harrisville, Jaffrey, Keene, Marlborough, Nelson, Peterborough, Rindge, Swanzey, and Winchendon.

Flexible payment plans so you don’t have to pay all at once.

Fall Shares!

Still quite a ways out, but it doesn’t hurt to plan ahead, and the fall share helps you plan through the winter. Plenty of potatoes, sweet potatoes, garlic, carrots, winter squash, and more to last you well into January and potentially beyond.

Workshare!

Don’t have the time to commit to an entire season? The workshare position is perfect for folks that want to spend a day out of the week working and learning on a farm! We love having workshares on the farm because it is an opportunity to meet members in the community. The farm feels more alive with lots of people around. Workshares fill a wide variety of roles on the farm.

Lunch Prep
Farmers Market
Harvest
Weeding
Wash/Pack
Field
& Delivery Drivers!

In exchange for working seven hours per week on the farm, workshares are fed lunch on their workday and receive a weekly basket of produce with the bread and egg options included. Typically those hours are completed in one day, with the exception of the lunch prep workshare.

If you are interested in a workshare position, please call or email Jack:

Glazed Hakurei Turnips

On the Farm

Good evening! It is another beautiful Monday to be followed by a dreary forecast. My weather app was saying 6″ of snow yesterday, it has since downgraded to 3″. My preference is none at all, if you ask me.

You might notice that I mention the weather first off every newsletter. That is a little bit of a reflection of my own day to day. Monday morning of every week we take a look at the forecast to plan our projects for each day. If it there is a forecast for rain, we plan to be inside that day. Sunny, outside. And then each morning I check the forecast again and see if anything needs to be moved around. This job is almost entirely dependent on the weather, which is why I am always mentioning it in the newsletter.

Today was perfect weather for being outside. We started our day pruning the rest of our raspberries. All done! We then thinned any raspberry canes that were growing into the path and replanted them in the missing parts of the bed. I was mentioning last week that we needed a plan for our raspberry patch, and a plan has been executed! It’s always nice when that works out.

While the crew was in the raspberry patch, I checked out the garlic that has been coming up and fertilized it for the spring. So far it’s looking good!

As for the rest of the farm, we are humming right along and according to schedule. We spend about 2 days a week working in the propagation greenhouse seeding, transplanting, and potting up seedlings for the stand and the field. Wednesday is our harvest day, and that takes up the bulk of the day. We have two more short beds to weed and then the greenhouses are all caught up with! We will be doing that tomorrow morning.

Farm Store and Plant Stand Open Friday 4/22!

Our Store and Stand will open officially this Friday! We’ve had the store open on a limited basis to sell eggs and the occasional extra greens from shares. This week we will be opening in earnest with lots of other great local treats! Ice cream, cheese, eggs, honey, and more!

The plant stand will also be open this weekend. Variety is limited to what is appropriate to put outdoors this time of year, but there are some gorgeous looking lettuce starts for all of you that can’t wait to start your garden!

SPRING SHARES WEEK 6

We’ve reached the halfway point in the season! The second half is looking good with lots of new beds seeded and longer maturing varieties starting to come in. We’ll have pretty similar looking shares for the next couple of weeks, then start seeing a lot more variety. Most importantly, the peas have started to blossom! Just a few weeks away from delicious snap peas!

Shares Week 6:
Lettuce Mix
Micro Greens
Radishes
Spicy Salad Mix
Spinach
Turnips with greens

Egg Share: 12 Week Share Only
Bread Share: Roasted Red Pepper and Cheddar

LINK: Glazed Hakurei Turnips w/ Greens

This is one of our favorite spring recipes on the farm. Every time turnips are coming in from the greenhouse we make some for lunch! Plus you can include your radishes!

Ingredients

3 bunches baby hakurei turnips, baby turnips, or red radishes (about 2 pounds), trimmed, greens reserved

1/4 cup (1/2 stick) unsalted butter

3 tablespoons sugar

Kosher salt

Instructions

Step 1

Place turnips in a large skillet; add water to cover turnips halfway. Add butter, sugar, and a large pinch of salt; bring to a boil. Cook, stirring occasionally, until liquid is syrupy and turnips are tender, about 15 minutes. (If turnips are tender before liquid has reduced, use a slotted spoon to transfer turnips to a plate and reduce liquid until syrupy. Return turnips to pan and stir to coat well.) DO AHEAD: Can be made 4 hours ahead. Let stand at room temperature. Rewarm before continuing.
Step 2

Add turnip greens to skillet and cook over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until just wilted, 2–3 minutes. Season with salt.

Accepting Members through the Monadnock Farm Share Program!

The Monadnock Farm Share program makes farm shares more accessible for community members who otherwise would not be able to participate in a local community supported agriculture (CSA) program. CSA programs are an opportunity for community members to enjoy farm fresh produce, while supporting local agriculture! Through the program, community members pay 50% of the total farm share cost.

This year, the Cheshire County Conservation District (CCCD) has received additional funding for farm shares for local BIPOC (Black, Indigenous, and People of Color) families. We are working to expand accessibility and awareness of this program, any assistance in spreading the word is greatly appreciated!

This year’s applications are due by May 1, 2022, and will be reviewed on a rolling basis (first come, first served). Community members choose from a listing of participating farms throughout the region, including Tracie’s Community Farm!

To access this year’s application, participating farm list, and for more information visit: https://cheshireconservation.org/farmshare

Help Us Reach Our Goal!

Last week we presented to a group at the Hannah Grimes Center to help fund an infrastructure project on the farm to improve our food safety practices.

In order to raise funds for the project, we are selling an additional 10 CSA shares to be donated to a local food pantry or charitable organization. Money from the shares will go to purchasing stainless steel countertops to replace our wooden packing tables in the barn, upgrading our greens spinners so that they have a removable contact surface, and re-insulating our walk-in to improve efficiency and hold a more stable temperature.

If you would like to contribute to our project and to the community, please reach out as soon as possible. Our goal is to fund the project by May 1st.

Summer CSA Shares!

Summer Shares are available! Right now we are at about 80% sold on shares, and orders keep coming in every day.

We have a 16 week full share or an 8 week half share available. The full share gets a basket every week, and the half share gets one every other week. They feature staples and as well as lesser known varieties. In total we grow about 30 unique veggies for the summer season!

Home delivery is available in 11 towns. Dublin, Fitzwilliam, Harrisville, Jaffrey, Keene, Marlborough, Nelson, Peterborough, Rindge, Swanzey, and Winchendon.

Flexible payment plans so you don’t have to pay all at once.

Monadnock Earth Day Film Festival

LINK

APRIL 20 – 22, 2022

MFCC, producer of Feast On This! Film Festival, will partner with the Monadnock International Film Festival and the Monadnock Food Co-op to transform the annual in-person Monadnock Earth Festival into a virtual film festival. The Monadnock Earth Day Film Festival will take place from April 20 – 22, 2022. This free online event will feature films and host panel discussions to celebrate and cultivate a more resilient world.

“Uniting our Film Festivals into one energizing and impactful event is such a win-win for MFCC and the region,” said Roe-Ann Tasoulas from the Feast On This! Film Festival. “We’re able to offer our community 3, ag-related short films addressing climate change, resiliency and equality. ”
FILMS:

FARM FREE OR DIE – 2022
Climate Change | English | 28 mins
Farm Free or Die highlights the need for transformative agricultural policies that improve farming livelihoods and open market opportunities for carbon sequestration and removal. Farmers on the front lines and investors around the world identify carbon sequestration as their best weapon against severe environmental and economic adversity, while simultaneously creating immediate financial opportunities and incentives for innovation in the agtech industry. Directed and written by Roger Sorkin. Sorkin will be available for audience questions and answers following the film.

GROWING WITH THE GRAIN – 2019
Food Sovereignty | English | Hudson River Valley Food Hub | 15 mins. Panel discussion follows screening. Growing With the Grain.
Synopsis: Upstate New York used to be a breadbasket of grain growing. Westward expansion yielded more ideal climates for growing and production shifted to the midwest. Scientists, farmers, bakers and brewers take part in a grain trial test that hopes to produce a new generation of grain suited for the northeast, bringing sustainable and more localized grain production back to the region. New England Grainshed Alliance members, Sarah Cox of Tuckaway Farm, and Christian and Andrea Stanley of Valley Malt/Ground Up join Keene’s Sam Temple of Fire Dog Bread in a discussion how distilleries, farmers, brewers, and bakers can be a part of the Grainshed movement!

FARMER CEE — 2019
BIPOC Farming | Social Justice | Land and Food Access | 12.07 mins. Panel discussion follows screening. Farmer Cee.
Clarenda “Cee” Stanley is currently the CEO/President of Green Heffa Farms. From an agrarian family in Alabama’s Black Belt, Cee did not see herself as a farmer. But in 2018, she co-founded Green Heffa Farms and was selected to be the 2019 Featured Farmer for Hemp History Week. However, in 2019, Cee also found herself being solely responsible for Green Heffa Farms and from there, she began to reimagine the legacy she wanted to leave for her children and grandchildren. A panel discussion will follow the screening. More coming…

“MONIFF is thrilled to partner with the Monadnock Food Co-op and Feast On This! Film Festival to celebrate Earth Day by bringing the community together through diverse films and thoughtful discussions,” said Dee Fitzgerald from Monadnock International Film Festival.

This event is free.

Fall Shares!

Still quite a ways out, but it doesn’t hurt to plan ahead, and the fall share helps you plan through the winter. Plenty of potatoes, sweet potatoes, garlic, carrots, winter squash, and more to last you well into January and potentially beyond.

Apr

Workshare!

Don’t have the time to commit to an entire season? The workshare position is perfect for folks that want to spend a day out of the week working and learning on a farm! We love having workshares on the farm because it is an opportunity to meet members in the community. The farm feels more alive with lots of people around. Workshares fill a wide variety of roles on the farm.

Lunch Prep
Farmers Market
Harvest
Weeding
Wash/Pack
Field
& Delivery Drivers!

In exchange for working seven hours per week on the farm, workshares are fed lunch on their workday and receive a weekly basket of produce with the bread and egg options included. Typically those hours are completed in one day, with the exception of the lunch prep workshare.

If you are interested in a workshare position, please call or email Jack:

443-994-4629 — Farmers@traciesfarm