End of the summer

Time to Sign Up for Fall CSA Shares!

We are under a month out from the beginning of our Fall CSA share! I call the fall share the “Farmer’s Favorite Share.” It is loaded with all the storage veggies we grow on the farm–carrots, beets, onions, garlic, winter squash–as well as potatoes and sweet potatoes that we buy in. Plus all the super sweet fall veggies like broccoli, spinach, chard, and cabbage. I love this share and so do our longtime fall members.

Off farm pickup locations available in Peterborough, Keene, Swanzey, and Nelson.

Shares run for eight weeks between October 5th and the week of Thanksgiving.

FALL SHARES START NEXT WEEK. FIRST PICKUP 10/5

Even though summer shares are coming to an end, plenty of members will keep receiving weekly veggies until Thanksgiving!

Fall CSA shares will begin the week immediately following the end of summer shares, Wednesday, October 5th. I will be in touch with all members via email regarding pickup locations and times.

There are still some CSA shares left, if anyone wants to join before its too late! We have some nice looking crops of beets, carrots, cabbage, greens, winter squash, and herbs maturing in the fields. Most crops store well through the winter, so members can keep eating Tracie’s produce into the new year.

On the Farm

We’ve reached the end of summer shares :/ Every year I talk about the bittersweet end of the summer season. On the one hand, I’m exhausted. Always am. I think I always will be at this time of the year? I know I’m not alone. Our farm meets up monthly with a group of other farmers in the Monadnock Region. One afternoon a month we meet at someones farm and help out for the afternoon. A few weeks ago we traveled to Hungry Bear Farm and helped Farmer Gene pull dry beans for his spring CSA next year–it gave me some ideas… The work is usually light, and we get a chance to talk shop. It’s hard to get together with farmers to have a conversation. Most times I see a farmer I know, we chat briefly and then both declare we gotta run off somewhere. We’re always being tugged in a hundred directions. These meetings give us a chance to sit down and get to know one another, ask about our farms, see new practices, and check in how the season is going. It’s around this time of year that we’re all counting down the weeks til share season ends. Not because we don’t love growing food for our community, but because its the end of a long summer. The light started to change, the wind picked up, and when you work outside every day, these things signal that it is almost time for rest.

So it is bittersweet. I am ready for rest, but I will miss the summer. The farm doesn’t feel alive like it does in the throes of August. It is already quieter on the farm. We see less CSA members each week as we move into fall CSA shares, and we have a little more time at the end of packing shares, so the barn isn’t a bustling scene every Wednesday as we greet delivery drivers and CSA members while putting the last bit of produce in the baskets. I’ll miss our crew. We have started to drop down on farmers as fall doesn’t demand the same degree of labor. It was a close group this summer. We are currently in a hacky sack faze, and have spent most breaks and lunches hollering over trying to pass the little ball between us.

It’s only the end of summer, though, and there is plenty of excitement left for fall. Digging roots is all farmers favorite activity. What is more exciting than pulling a bright orange carrot out of the dark soil like it’s Excalibur? It’s not an exaggeration, sometimes it tests the will of the farmer to remove carrots from the dense, cold earth. I’m looking forward to fall shares. We’ve got some beautiful greens that are thriving in the cool weather. We’ll be passing out ginger for the first time ever! We trialed it last year, and this year grew enough that share members will get some. Beets are looking healthy, brussel sprouts are “brusseling,” and winter squash is just about ready to be pulled from the field.

Thank you to everyone that participated in our Summer CSA this year. It was a pleasure to serve you, and I hope you leave feeling a little closer to your food and community. I will be in touch in the coming weeks asking for feedback. It was another challenging growing season, the third in the last few years that we have seen record setting weather events. Climate change impacts the way we have to farm, and adjusting to it takes the whole community. I will be looking for advice on how we can improve our CSA shares while keeping in mind limitations due to the changing climate. Growing efficiently will be key to dealing with instability, and we grow for our members, so I would like to hear what you think. Thanks to all. I hope to hear from you soon!

SUMMER SHARES WEEK 16!

A reminder that we are on the even week schedule for half shares. FULL SHARES receive a basket every week. HALF SHARES receive a basket every other week.

EVEN WEEKS

Week 2 – 6/22 Week 10 – 8/17
Week 4 – 7/6 Week 12 – 8/31
Week 6 – 7/20 Week 14 – 9/14
Week 8 – 8/3 Week 16 – 9/28

ODD WEEKS

Week 1 – 6/15 Week 9 – 8/10
Week 3 – 6/29 Week 11 – 8/24
Week 5 – 7/13 Week 13 – 9/7
Week 7 – 7/27 Week 15 – 9/21

We attempted to put shares in paper bags last week and realized we can’t do it with the quality bags we have in the barn. In previous years we’ve had real sturdy bags that could hold up to a little moisture from the produce, but the stock we have this year disintegrates with just a drop. If all members could please drop off your last basket at the farm when convenient, we would appreciate it. Delivery members can reach out to me about dropping at one of our fall CSA pickup locations to be collected and brought back to the farm. If you are unable to make it to a pickup location or the farm, please contact me and I will make arrangements.

Bok Choy will be making its appearance in shares for the first time since the beginning of the summer. I will include a recipe for Tracie’s favorite bok choy salad below. Cabbage is cycling back into shares. Chard is the green this week. More lettuce woes… I went to harvest for an order from the beds I was planning to use for shares this week, and every single head was munched on by a deer. There was not one head left that I could use for the order, let alone shares this week. Dill is the fresh herb for this week. Fennel is back in shares. Garlic is a staple. Onions we’ll be passing out some of our smaller onions. I’m driving down to Atlas Farm in MA tomorrow to pick up our fall Potato order. We don’t grow our fall potatoes on the farm for space and labor reasons, and Atlas Farm does a great job producing organic potatoes. Peppers we’ll keep passing em out as long as we have them. Tomatoes are the same.

Check for recipes below!

Shares Week 16:
Bok Choy
Cabbage
Chard
Dill
Fennel
Garlic
Onions
Potatoes
Peppers
Tomatoes — Cherries, Romas, or Slicing Toms

Egg Share: CHECK LIST FOR NAME
Bread Share: Cornmeal Pumpkin CHECK LIST FOR NAME

LINK: ROASTED FENNEL WITH GARLIC AND HERBS

Edamame is a great side dish for any meal. Similar to shishito peppers, it is easy to prepare and delicious!

Ingredients

Roasted Fennel Beet Salad

2 large bulbs fennel
3 tbsp olive oil
2 cloves garlic minced
3/4 tsp salt
1 tsp black pepper
1 tsp thyme
1/4 cup parmesan (omit if Dairy Free/Paleo/Vegan)

Directions

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees Fahrenheit (205 degrees Celsius)
Remove any of the stalks from the fennel bulbs and then cut them in half lengthwise. Cut each halved fennel bulb into 1/2 inch thick slices and arrange the slices on a parchment paper lined baking sheet ensuring that they are all laid out evenly and do not overlap.
In a bowl combine the olive oil and minced garlic and brush it over the sliced fennel and then sprinkle the thyme, salt and pepper overtop to ensure they are all well seasoned.
Roast the fennel in the oven for 25 minutes. After 25 minutes if using parmesan, sprinkle it over the fennel and then return the tray to the oven to bake for another 10 minutes.
After 35 minutes of baking the fennel should be tender and caramelized on the edges (cook for another 5-8 minutes if its not yet tender). Serve warm.

LINK: STUFFED CABBAGE

Ingredients

1 pound ground beef
1 onion, chopped
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 cup cooked brown rice
1 tablespoon mustard
1 large egg
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/8 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
1 head green cabbage
1 tablespoon olive oil
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 (16-ounce) can tomato puree
1 (14-ounce) can diced tomatoes, undrained
2 bay leaves
1/2 teaspoon salt

Directions

Gather the ingredients.
In a large saucepan, combine the ground beef with the onion and 2 cloves of the garlic; cook and stir to break up the meat until the beef is browned and the onion and garlic are tender; drain well and set aside.
In a large bowl, mix together the beef mixture, the cooked rice, mustard, egg, and salt and pepper until combined.
Cut out the core end of the cabbage and remove and discard some of the exterior leaves. Then carefully remove 8 whole perfect leaves. Soak the leaves in hot water in a large bowl until they are limp and pliable.
Chop half of the remaining cabbage and add this to the beef and rice mixture. Roll up about 1/4 cup of the meat mixture in each cabbage leaf. Reserve any remaining meat mixture. At this point, preheat the oven to 350 F.
Then, in the same large skillet, sauté 2 cloves of garlic in the olive oil until tender, about 2 to 3 minutes.
Add the tomato puree, diced tomatoes, bay leaves, salt, and pepper. Simmer this sauce for 15 minutes, stirring frequently. Then remove and discard the bay leaves.
Place the stuffed cabbage rolls in a Dutch oven or large casserole. Top the rolls with any remaining meat mixture. Pour the tomato sauce mixture over all.
Cover the casserole and bake for 80 to 90 minutes or until the cabbage rolls are tender.
Serve the stuffed cabbage with the sauce. Enjoy.

Weekly Newsletter 9/20

Time to Sign Up for Fall CSA Shares!

We are under a month out from the beginning of our Fall CSA share! I call the fall share the “Farmer’s Favorite Share.” It is loaded with all the storage veggies we grow on the farm–carrots, beets, onions, garlic, winter squash–as well as potatoes and sweet potatoes that we buy in. Plus all the super sweet fall veggies like broccoli, spinach, chard, and cabbage. I love this share and so do our longtime fall members.

Off farm pickup locations available in Peterborough, Keene, Swanzey, and Nelson.

Shares run for eight weeks between October 5th and the week of Thanksgiving.

On the Farm

Good morning, all! Sending the newsletter in the morning because I am always wiped after a gray, rainy day. The ground has been soaking up all this rain we”ve been getting. It’s kind of amazing to me how fast it gets absorbed. During the July deluge last year, the ground was so saturated that water pooled on the surface for a day or two after a heavy rain. Now it is so dry that even a couple inches of rain gets soaked up in a day or two.

The cover crops that I seeded last week have all germinated and are starting to take root in the soil. I said a couple weeks ago in the newsletter that one of the reasons August is a difficult month is because the rapid growth we see in the spring time is behind us. Not as much for cool loving cover crops. They have been growing steadily every day. I drove the van the long way around the farm yesterday to show the crew the bright green patches of cover crop/

We’re winding down our summer CSA. With just two weeks left, I’ve had the chance to reflect a little more on the season and reach out to some members about their opinions. Overall I would say it has been a slow year for us. We had a few stretches of weeks with bountiful harvests, but the dry weather meant shortened harvest windows and lower yields. Late summer was a real difficulty for us. But there were also plenty of successes, as well. It was the first year that we grew potatoes for summer shares, celery was a new addition, as well, and our summer squash and zucchini was extremely productive for longer than expected. Roots have fared well, and carrots were a staple in baskets for a good chunk of the season. Our garlic looks great through storage so far, and with a little rain, our fall crops are thriving. I would love to hear what members think of shares this year. We will be making some changes to our farm over the winter, and any feedback is appreciated. I will also be reaching out to members directly for feedback and opinions once we slow down a little bit. Until then, we’ll be packing baskets as full as we can each week!

SUMMER SHARES WEEK 15!

A reminder that we are on the even week schedule for half shares. FULL SHARES receive a basket every week. HALF SHARES receive a basket every other week.

EVEN WEEKS

Week 2 – 6/22 Week 10 – 8/17
Week 4 – 7/6 Week 12 – 8/31
Week 6 – 7/20 Week 14 – 9/14
Week 8 – 8/3 Week 16 – 9/28

ODD WEEKS

Week 1 – 6/15 Week 9 – 8/10
Week 3 – 6/29 Week 11 – 8/24
Week 5 – 7/13 Week 13 – 9/7
Week 7 – 7/27 Week 15 – 9/21

It is the second to last week of summer shares! Crazy how the time flies by. Delivery share baskets will receive paper bags this week as we try to collect all of our baskets.

Beets will be in shares this week, and the greens will be attached! Use them! They are basically a smaller stemmed chard. Perfect for sauteing, I will leave a recipe below. Fennel is making its way back into shares. Garlic is a staple and we’ll be spending all day today cleaning it. Leeks are back in shares. Unfortunately they are on the smaller side. Lettuce is finally back. We are picking them a little early, so they won’t be totally filled out yet, but we have been missing them in baskets and have enough to harvest some this week while we wait for the rest to size up for next week. Parsley is our herb of the week. Peppers should remain in shares through the end of summer. Shallots are going out to shares. Tomatoes should make it to everyone.

Check for recipes below!

Shares Week 15:
Beets w greens
Fennel
Garlic
Leeks
Lettuce
Parsley
Peppers — Sweet Red & Green
Shallots
Tomatoes — Cherries, Romas, or Slicing Toms

Egg Share: CHECK LIST FOR NAME
Bread Share: Red Pepper Cheddar CHECK LIST FOR NAME

LINK: ROASTED FENNEL BEET SALAD

Edamame is a great side dish for any meal. Similar to shishito peppers, it is easy to prepare and delicious!

Ingredients

Roasted Fennel Beet Salad

4 whole beets, red and golden
2 whole fennel bulbs, trimmed, cored, and sliced
2 teaspoons olive oil
1 pinch sea salt
4 cups mixed greens
1 whole shallot, thinly sliced

Homemade Honey Mustard Vinaigrette with Maille Mustard

¼ cup olive oil
1 tablespoon apple cider vinegar
2 teaspoons honey
1 tablespoon stone ground mustard
¼ cup orange juice, from one whole orange
1 Pinch salt and pepper

Directions

Prep oven: Preheat oven to 400 F.
To roast beets: Wash beets and place in a large glass baking dish filled with a small layer of water. Cover with aluminum foil and bake until soft and a fork can easily spear through, about 40 minutes. Let cool and sliced into cubes.
To roast fennel: Toss trimmed and cored fennel with olive oil and sea salt, then bake in a glass baking dish until soft and golden brown, about 30 minutes. Let cool.
To build salad: Arrange mixed greens, cooled beets and fennel, and shallot slices on a plate. Toss with Homemade Honey Mustard Vinaigrette (see recipe below).

Homemade Honey Mustard Dressing

Combine + whisk ingredients: Combine olive oil, apple cider vinegar, honey, Maille Old Style Mustard, juice of one orange, and a pinch of salt and pepper in a small glass mixing bowl. Whisk until well combined and toss with salad.

Cover Cropping!

Time to Sign Up for Fall CSA Shares!

We are under a month out from the beginning of our Fall CSA share! I call the fall share the “Farmer’s Favorite Share.” It is loaded with all the storage veggies we grow on the farm–carrots, beets, onions, garlic, winter squash–as well as potatoes and sweet potatoes that we buy in. Plus all the super sweet fall veggies like broccoli, spinach, chard, and cabbage. I love this share and so do our longtime fall members.

Shares run for eight weeks between October 5th and the week of Thanksgiving.

 
Fall VEggies Time to Sign Up for Fall CSA Shares! We are under a month out from the beginning of our Fall CSA share! I call the fall share the “Farmer’s Favorite Share.” It is loaded with all the storage veggies we grow on the farm–carrots, beets, onions, garlic, winter squash–as well as potatoes and sweet potatoes that we buy in. Plus all the super sweet fall veggies like broccoli, spinach, chard, and cabbage. I love this share and so do our longtime fall members. Shares run for eight weeks between October 5th and the week of Thanksgiving.
FALL SHARE SIGNUPS
HARRISVILLE/NELSON FALL PICKUP SITE AND DELIVERY DRIVER NEEDED We are looking for a pickup site in the Harrisville/Nelson area to receive shares on Wednesday evenings. We usually do this at someones house that has a covered deck, porch, or garage that members can easily pick up their share from. We are also looking for a driver to bring shares to the pickup location. Pickup location hosts receive 50% off their fall share, and drivers also receive 50%, so if you are able to do both, you can get a free fall share in exchange. Please email Jack at farmers@traciesfarm.com if you think you have a suitable site to use!

On the Farm

I was late getting in from the field last night, apologies for the late newsletter.

I got to spend the afternoon and evening doing my favorite duty on the farm, cover cropping! A rule of thumb for cover crops is that they should be in the ground by September 15th. With rain in the forecast, yesterday was our chance to get more fields seeded before the “deadline”. This was the second cover crop seeding of the year so far. The first was about a 1/2acre on September 1st. Last night I covered another acre or so.

It is notoriously difficult to seed cover crops on mixed vegetable farms. Most of our beds are “double cropped,” meaning we plant or seed into the same bed two times over the course of the season, and the ones that aren’t double cropped are usually used for long season crops. Because we crop our fields so intensively, it is difficult to get the final crop out in time to get a good stand of cover, it is also the reason why covering is so important on the farm.

Cover crops provide countless benefits to the soil. They can add nitrogen for plant growth, condition the soil for planting, smother weeds, break up compaction, contribute organic matter, retain moisture, soak up excess moisture and more and more and more. I’m reading a book on cover crop strategies as we speak. We don’t get to see the benefits until the following year, or for many years, but it is a top priority for me to keep figuring out how to get more of the farm covered and covered early. Over the years I have gotten better at it, and this year was the earliest I have ever been able to seed a cover crop! When I plan fields in the winter, I keep that September 15th deadline in mind for getting a cover down. In my mind, cover cropping has the same priority level as any of our marketable crops. Vegetable farming asks a lot of the soil. It is intensive production compared to a field of wheat or corn. We use fertilizer to help replenish the nutrients in the soil, but a cover crop will replenish nutrients while repairing the soil structure.

I could go on and on about cover crops. I mean it when I say that it is my favorite job on the farm, and I see it as a marker for my duty as a land steward. This year we’re using two different types of cover crops. One is a rye/oat/clover mix that will overwinter and keep growing in the spring until we terminate it to plant into. The other is a six species mix that was made to “winter kill” for early planting into in the spring. This is where a solid crop rotation is so important when it comes to cover cropping. Something like onions, which we aim to have planted by the first week of May, needs a cover crop that will be successfully terminated by the time we’re ready to plant. For those early beds I use the winter kill mix. Tomatoes, on the other hand, don’t get planted until the first week of June. For those we want a cover crop that will keep growing through the spring until we are ready to plant. But in order to plan what cover to use where, I need to know now where crops will be next year. I have been working on solidifying our crop rotation over the past couple of years, and a big part of my motivation was to figure out how to cover crop more effectively. Crop rotation has its own benefits, which I’ll get into in another newsletter, but suffice to say soil conservation requires a multi faceted approach that combines crop rotation and cover cropping, along with many other cultural practices.

I wrote the beginning of the newsletter this morning before the crew arrived, and am finishing up now before we take lunch. We sure got a soaking first thing! Abigail, Joe, and I pulled beets for shares tomorrow and started in on our edamame harvest.

We are still in a little bit of a lull that is carrying over from last week. There are a few crops teetering on the edge of maturity. Lettuce heads need one more week, same with bok choy and broccoli. Believe it or not, our weekly harvest is based off a schedule I set in the winter. Almost all of our crops are on a schedule by date of harvest, it’s the only way to make sure that we are planting in time to fill baskets for any given week. Obviously that schedule fluctuates throughout the season, and right now we are behind by a couple of weeks. The lack of rain in July and August set back planting times, but also days to maturity for a lot of crops. Without much water to drink, the plants don’t grow as fast as their potential. Lettuce, broccoli, and bok choy were all supposed to be ready for last week, but we’re still waiting on them. Other crops that are usually safe bets this time of year haven’t performed as expected. Our eggplant set out an initial fruit set, but the second flowering never really occurred, and beans have been decimated by deer and are only producing marginally. That wouldn’t be such a problem except that the other fall veg is lagging behind, which means I am scrambling to figure out what will fill baskets this week. Last week I thought we’d have a lull, but were able to put together a pretty decent basket regardless. We’ll see what we are able to do this week. If it is a lull week, rest assured that the final two weeks should have some very full baskets.

SUMMER SHARES WEEK 14!

A reminder that we are on the even week schedule for half shares. FULL SHARES receive a basket every week. HALF SHARES receive a basket every other week.

EVEN WEEKS

Week 2 – 6/22 Week 10 – 8/17
Week 4 – 7/6 Week 12 – 8/31
Week 6 – 7/20 Week 14 – 9/14
Week 8 – 8/3 Week 16 – 9/28

ODD WEEKS

Week 1 – 6/15 Week 9 – 8/10
Week 3 – 6/29 Week 11 – 8/24
Week 5 – 7/13 Week 13 – 9/7
Week 7 – 7/27 Week 15 – 9/21

I was please with what we were able to put together in shares last week, and this week I’ll be checking in on items that can make it into shares as the week progresses. We have a few beds about a week out of maturity, so if we have a lean week this week, it will be made up for over the last two weeks. Greens in particular. Our Lettuce, Bok Choy, and Salad Mix are all a week away from going into baskets. Squash is off of the harvest list after production fell off a cliff following some cool nights. Beets will be in shares this week. They are Chiogga beets and a more pink hue of red. They almost look like a radish. Beets will be a mix of large and small. Edamame will be in shares this week! My favorite side dish. We’re gonna harvest a big bag for folks, and I’ll include a recipe below. Garlic is a staple. We’ll include some small Kale bunches just to have a green in shares. Leeks are the allium this week. Peppers might have another week or so left in them. Sage is the herb this week. I like to pair it with beets. Tomatoes of some variety will make it into shares.

Check for recipes below!

Shares Week 14:
Beets
Edamame
Garlic
Kale
Leeks
Peppers — Sweet Red & Green
Sage
Tomatoes — Cherries, Romas, or Slicing Toms

Egg Share: CHECK LIST FOR NAME
Bread Share: Cinnamon Raisin CHECK LIST FOR NAME

EDAMAME

Edamame is a great side dish for any meal. Similar to shishito peppers, it is easy to prepare and delicious!

Ingredients

Edamame
water
Salt

Directions

Bring water and salt to a boil. Add edamame and cook for 5 minutes until edamame are tender and easily release from their pod.
Drain thoroughly and toss generously with a coarse finishing salt like kosher salt or fleur de sel. Serve warm or cold.

LINK: ROASTED BEETS WITH BACON, SAGE, AND BROWN BUTTER

Ingredients

2lb beets
olive oil, as needed
4 strips bacon
1 red onion, julienned
2 oz. unsalted butter
½ cup walnuts
1 oz.honey
1 oz. lemon juice
1 oz. apple cider vinegar
6 Fresh sage leaves
¼ cup flat-leaf parsley

Directions

Heat a convection oven to 375 degrees. Coat the beets lightly with the olive oil. Wrap them in aluminum foil, place on a sheet pan and bake for about 45 minutes. Remove the beets from the oven and let cool for 10 minutes.
Peel, cut them in half horizontally and slice them into wedges. While the beets are cooking, slice the bacon into small pieces. Heat a sauté pan over medium heat and cook the bacon until most of the fat is rendered and the pieces are crisp.
Remove the bacon from the pan and reserve pan with the bacon fat for later use. In a 14-inch pan over medium heat, add the butter and cook until just before it starts to brown, about 3 minutes. Add the roasted gold beets to the pan and sauté for 2 minutes.
Add the julienned red onion and cook for 3 minutes longer. Add walnuts, honey, lemon juice and apple cider vinegar and cook for 5 minutes longer. Once the pan sauce has started to thicken, add in the sage and bacon and cook for 2 minutes longer.
Reheat the pan with bacon fat to medium heat. Add the roasted red beets and get a nice sear. Cook for about 5 minutes, then remove from the heat. Add the red beets to the gold beet pan, finish with fresh parsley and serve.

LINK: CREAMY KALE AND LEEKS

Ingredients

1 tablespoon butter
2 tablespoons olive oil
2 large leeks, halved and thinly sliced (white and light green parts only)
4 cloves garlic, smashed with the side of a knife
Sea salt
1 teaspoon chile flakes
Zest and juice of 1 lemon
Black pepper
1½ cups heavy cream
2 bunches lacinato kale, thick stems trimmed, leaves chopped in quarters

Directions

In a large sauté pan with a cover, warm the butter and olive oil over medium-high heat. Add the leeks and garlic cloves, season with salt, and sauté for 5 minutes, stirring regularly, until the leeks are fully softened (if they look like they might start to brown, turn down the heat). Add the chile flakes, lemon juice and zest and loads of black pepper, stir well, and add the cream.

Let the cream come to a simmer (you want some gentle bubbles here) and then add as much kale as the pan can hold in a single layer. Cover the pan, lower the heat to medium, let the kale wilt for a minute or so, then give it a thorough stir to coat it with the cream. Add a splash of water (2-3 tablespoons) and another sprinkle of salt; cover again, and let cook for another minute or two, stirring it occasionally, until the kale is wilted enough to make room for more.

Repeat as many times as needed (but don’t add water unless your cream has cooked away too quickly) until all the kale is fully wilted in the cream. Lower the heat even more and let it cook a bit longer. You want it to cook way down, until it’s dark, soft, and creamy. Before serving, check for seasoning: You may want a bit more black pepper, a bit more salt and a final sprinkle of chile flakes.

RAIN!

On the Farm

Happy Labor Day! The plants stop for no one, so we were out harvesting today, but we hope everyone else was able to get in some end of summer celebrating before the rain set in.

We’re going to get about the month of August’s worth of rain over today and tomorrow, and we’ll need every inch. Usually I say that I don’t want it all to drop at once, but this isn’t so bad. A few inches of soft rain over the course of two days is a whole lot better than a storm dropping an inch over a half hour. The water has time to seep into the soil, and because it has been so dry, a hard rain would have pooled and shed off the surface, taking a lot of soil with it. The predicted 3inches will still be a lot of moisture for the land to deal with, but after months of drought, this is the kind of precipitation we need to break the dryness.

It’s a tough week on the farm this week. We were down a couple pairs of hands today, tomorrow we’ll be down one pair, and on Wednesday we’ll be shorthanded by two again. Not a huge deal, we tailor our plan each week depending on who we have, and whenever we have a small crew the farmers always step up in a big way. But harvest and distribution take a long time on the farm, and Joe and I will be doing some harvest tomorrow to ease the load on Wednesday. What I am struggling with this week is what we have available for shares, and having less hands means getting the harder to pick items takes significantly more time. We’re down a few items that I was planning on having ready this week, and trying to replace those with other will take us some time.

There are a few crops that won’t be ready but Wednesday that should have matured enough by now. I was hoping some of our lettuce beds would have come in on time, our bean harvest would have picked up some more, and that edamame would be ready to start passing out. None of that came to be, so now I’m scrambling a bit to figure out shares for this week. The good news is that our fall crops are looking wonderful and this rain is going to be great for them. By next week we should be back rolling with baskets. Could be a lighter week this week, read on below.

Fall Shares are Going Fast! We are one month out from the beginning of our Fall CSA share! I call the fall share the “Farmer’s Favorite Share.” It is loaded with all the storage veggies we grow on the farm–carrots, beets, onions, garlic, winter squash–as well as potatoes and sweet potatoes that we buy in. Plus all the super sweet fall veggies like broccoli, spinach, chard, and cabbage. I love this share and so do our longtime fall members. We are about 50% sold out for the season already, so I recommend reserving your spot now.
FALL SHARE SIGNUPS

SUMMER SHARES WEEK 13!

A reminder that we are on the even week schedule for half shares. FULL SHARES receive a basket every week. HALF SHARES receive a basket every other week.

EVEN WEEKS

Week 2 – 6/22 Week 10 – 8/17
Week 4 – 7/6 Week 12 – 8/31
Week 6 – 7/20 Week 14 – 9/14
Week 8 – 8/3 Week 16 – 9/28

ODD WEEKS

Week 1 – 6/15 Week 9 – 8/10
Week 3 – 6/29 Week 11 – 8/24
Week 5 – 7/13 Week 13 – 9/7
Week 7 – 7/27 Week 15 – 9/21

The share list this week looks small, but it is because it only includes the items that will be in all baskets. We have beets, beans, eggplant, and arugula that will make it to some baskets but not all. To me this is the best way to get everyone a fair basket without having to stretch a smaller amount to all share members. Carrots are back in shares. I hesitate to keep passing out carrots so often, but we have to pick what is ready for the time being. I’m hoping as more of our fall crops come in that we won’t have to be as reliant on carrots in shares. I keep carrots as our backup share filler because they tend to be well received by our membership. I know I personally eat like 20 carrots a week because they are my go to field snack, and their versatility to be used as a snack, in a soup, or as a side dish make them a good backup plan. Dill will be the fresh herb this week. Garlic and Onions are weekly occurrences. Peppers are doing well in the field.

TO NOTE ABOUT PEPPERS: This week everyone will be getting shishito peppers in their share basket. These peppers are not spicy! They look very spicy, and maybe 1 in 10 has a little kick to it, but for the most part they are a semi-sweet pepper that is delicious fried whole with some oil, salt, and pepper. I’ll put the recipe below. It’s a simple and delicious side dish. Additionally, the long red peppers are also not spicy! They are Carmen peppers and every year members worry that they will bite into something super hot. Carmens are the opposite, they are super sweet! The only hot peppers we grow are jalapenos. They usually start coming in heavy enough for shares by mid september. Joe bit into one today and it gave him the hiccups in about 2 seconds.

Squash and Zukes will start their decline this week. It’s been a good squash year, and all good things must come to an end. Tomatoes ah, what a bummer tomato season has been for us so far. This week is our chance to get membership a good haul. The dry weather pushed back harvest by a couple weeks, and the fruit set on our outdoor tomatoes was significantly smaller in size without any water to plump them up. With outdoor tomatoes getting an early harvest is critical because disease pressure is so intense. Our greenhouse will keep producing for longer, but that is mostly cherries and some romas. Members will get tomatoes, but it has been a let down, in my opinion.

Check for recipes below!

Shares Week 13:
Carrots
Dill
Garlic
Onions
Peppers — Sweet Red, Green, and Shishito
Summer Squash and Zucchini
Tomatoes — Cherries and Slicing Toms

Egg Share: CHECK LIST FOR NAME
Bread Share: Cinnamon Raisin CHECK LIST FOR NAME

PAN FRIED SHISHITO PEPPERS

I made this last week as a side for our crew lunch. These are a new variety we are growing this year and they are delicious. It is a super simple recipe, and only takes about 5 minutes to prepare.

Ingredients

1 Pint Shishito Peppers
2 Tbsp oil of your choice (I use olive oil)
Salt and pepper to your liking

Directions

Heat the oil on a skillet
Add shishito peppers, salt and pepper
Saute until skin of peppers starts to blister
Serve warm

LINK: EASY TOMATO SOUP

Ingredients

4 tablespoons unsalted butter
1/2 large onion, cut into large wedges
1 (28-ounce) can tomatoes, we prefer to use whole peeled or crushed, see notes for fresh tomatoes
1 ½ cups water, low sodium vegetable stock, or chicken stock
1/2 teaspoon fine sea salt, or more to taste

Directions

Melt butter over medium heat in a Dutch oven or large saucepan.
Add onion wedges, water, can of tomatoes with their juices, and 1/2 teaspoon of salt. Bring to a simmer. Cook, uncovered, for about 40 minutes. Stir occasionally and add additional salt as needed.
Blend the soup, and then season to taste. The soup doesn’t need to be ultra-smooth, some texture is a nice touch. An immersion blender does make quick work of this, or you can use a blender. If you use a regular blender, it is best to blend in batches and not fill the blender as much as you usually would since the soup is so hot. We like to remove the center insert of the lid and cover it with a kitchen towel while blending — this helps to release some of the steam and prevents the blender lid from popping off (which can be a big, hot mess).

LINK: EASY HUMMUS

Not really one that uses farm ingredients, but since we’ve been passing out carrots so I figured I’d include it. Homemade hummus is always better, in my opinion, and carrots and hummus are a classic pair!

Ingredients

1 (15-ounce) can chickpeas or 1 ½ cups (250 grams) cooked chickpeas
1/4 cup (60 ml) fresh lemon juice, 1 large lemon
1/4 cup (60 ml) well-stirred tahini, see our homemade tahini recipe
1 small garlic clove, minced
2 tablespoons (30 ml) extra-virgin olive oil, plus more for serving
1/2 teaspoon ground cumin
Salt to taste
2 to 3 tablespoons (30 to 45 ml) water or aquafaba, see notes
Dash ground paprika or sumac, for serving

Directions

In the bowl of a food processor, combine the tahini and lemon juice and process for 1 minute, scrape the sides and bottom of the bowl then process for 30 seconds more. This extra time helps “whip” or “cream” the tahini, making the hummus smooth and creamy.How to Make Hummus-Recipe-Step-1
Add the olive oil, minced garlic, cumin, and a 1/2 teaspoon of salt to the whipped tahini and lemon juice. Process for 30 seconds, scrape the sides and bottom of the bowl then process another 30 seconds or until well blended. Open, drain, and rinse the chickpeas. Add half of the chickpeas to the food processor and process for 1 minute. Scrape sides and bottom of the bowl, then add remaining chickpeas and process until thick and quite smooth; 1 to 2 minutes.How-to-Make-Hummus-Recipe-Step-2
Most likely the hummus will be too thick or still have tiny bits of chickpea. To fix this, with the food processor turned on, slowly add 2 to 3 tablespoons of water until you reach the perfect consistency.How-to-Make-Hummus-Recipe-Step-3
Taste for salt and adjust as needed. Serve hummus with a drizzle of olive oil and dash of paprika. Store homemade hummus in an airtight container and refrigerate up to one week.

More Drought…

On the Farm

Everyone has to cross their fingers for rain, OK? We’re hurting for it now. The storms largely missed us last week. Maybe a half inch over all of Monday night and Tuesday? Whatever we got, it was gone by Thursday. Shares are still looking good for this week, but we’re in a critical time for a lot of our veggies. Granted, you can say that just about any time during the summer on a mixed veggie farm, but we have about 25% of our fields in new plantings for fall that need some moisture, and maturing crops getting ready for harvest will suffer without a rain.

This’ll be the last newsletter in August, and the forecast for September 1st has the night temps plunging into the 40’s. Woo! Light at the end of the tunnel! I’m going to ignore that the temps are supposed to rise again later in the week and count it as a win. The crew and I are getting antsy for some cool mornings. Farming in the fall is easily the best part of the job, the spring is a close second, and the summer, well, it’s a labor of love. But the fall, I could gush over it for an entire newsletter. The wind starts to pick up a little, we get to ease into the day wearing long sleeves and shedding layers as we go, the leaves start to turn, making every field a post card, and we get to start picking my personal favorite crops of the season. I love planning for fall because it is full of my favorite crops to grow; beets, carrots, winter squash, radicchio, onions, leeks, and pumpkins.

Our winter squash has been a pain point this season. The dryness delayed our transplants getting into the ground on time, and the plants never recovered. Luckily there was some extra space around the farm and I direct seeded a few rows, but those will come in late, and it’s not as much space as I originally planned. We’ll see. The pumpkins and the gourds, though, they’re looking great.

More on CSA shares below.

SUMMER SHARES WEEK 12!

A reminder that we are on the even week schedule for half shares. FULL SHARES receive a basket every week. HALF SHARES receive a basket every other week.

EVEN WEEKS

Week 2 – 6/22 Week 10 – 8/17
Week 4 – 7/6 Week 12 – 8/31
Week 6 – 7/20 Week 14 – 9/14
Week 8 – 8/3 Week 16 – 9/28

ODD WEEKS

Week 1 – 6/15 Week 9 – 8/10
Week 3 – 6/29 Week 11 – 8/24
Week 5 – 7/13 Week 13 – 9/7
Week 7 – 7/27 Week 15 – 9/21

We’re gonna keep the Carrots coming this week. We’re finally picking out of the new bed and they are in much better shape than the last carrots we were picking. Not as sweet, though. Cilantro is the herb for this week. Eggplant should make it around shares. Garlic is a staple. Head Lettuce is not looking the best but will be in shares regardless. Kale is back in shares. We’ve been picking it heavy to keep it productive for the fall. Onions, Peppers & Squash are mainstays. Tomatoes. I keep saying that they are coming, and we have passed out some, but we’re not anywhere near what I would expect in shares this season. I’m sure the plants were impacted by drought, and despite a good, healthy start, we’re seeing a ton of slow turning and smaller tomatoes. We’ll pass out everything we get.

Check for recipes below!

Shares Week 12:
Carrots
Cilantro
Eggplant
Garlic
Head Lettuce
Kale
Onions
Peppers
Summer Squash and Zucchini
Tomatoes

Egg Share: CHECK LIST FOR NAME
Bread Share: Cinnamon Raisin CHECK LIST FOR NAME

LINK: CARROT SALSA

Cilantro calls for salsa, simple as that.

Ingredients

Veggies

2 cups Baby Carrots, chopped fine
1 Ripe Mango, diced
6 Scallions, diced
1/3 cup Red Onion, chopped
1 cup Cilantro, chopped
1 cup Cherry Tomatoes, sliced
2 Garlic Cloves, sliced and chopped
2 Jalapeno Peppers, diced
Hot Sauce to taste
Salt & Pepper to taste

Directions

Mix all ingredients in a bowl.
Taste for seasoning.
Refrigerate in a sealed container at least 1 hour – overnight is preferred.

LINK: EASY HUMMUS

Not really one that uses farm ingredients, but since we’ve been passing out carrots so I figured I’d include it. Homemade hummus is always better, in my opinion, and carrots and hummus are a classic pair!

Ingredients

1 (15-ounce) can chickpeas or 1 ½ cups (250 grams) cooked chickpeas
1/4 cup (60 ml) fresh lemon juice, 1 large lemon
1/4 cup (60 ml) well-stirred tahini, see our homemade tahini recipe
1 small garlic clove, minced
2 tablespoons (30 ml) extra-virgin olive oil, plus more for serving
1/2 teaspoon ground cumin
Salt to taste
2 to 3 tablespoons (30 to 45 ml) water or aquafaba, see notes
Dash ground paprika or sumac, for serving

Directions

In the bowl of a food processor, combine the tahini and lemon juice and process for 1 minute, scrape the sides and bottom of the bowl then process for 30 seconds more. This extra time helps “whip” or “cream” the tahini, making the hummus smooth and creamy.How to Make Hummus-Recipe-Step-1
Add the olive oil, minced garlic, cumin, and a 1/2 teaspoon of salt to the whipped tahini and lemon juice. Process for 30 seconds, scrape the sides and bottom of the bowl then process another 30 seconds or until well blended. Open, drain, and rinse the chickpeas. Add half of the chickpeas to the food processor and process for 1 minute. Scrape sides and bottom of the bowl, then add remaining chickpeas and process until thick and quite smooth; 1 to 2 minutes.How-to-Make-Hummus-Recipe-Step-2
Most likely the hummus will be too thick or still have tiny bits of chickpea. To fix this, with the food processor turned on, slowly add 2 to 3 tablespoons of water until you reach the perfect consistency.How-to-Make-Hummus-Recipe-Step-3
Taste for salt and adjust as needed. Serve hummus with a drizzle of olive oil and dash of paprika. Store homemade hummus in an airtight container and refrigerate up to one week.

LINK: KALE SOUP

Soup is a great use for summer kale. We might even have some soup weather later this week!

Ingredients

2 tablespoons olive oil
1 tablespoon salted butter (or olive oil)
1 large white onion, diced
1 medium carrot, peeled and diced
2 28-ounce cans diced fire roasted tomatoes*
4 cups vegetable broth
2 15-ounce cans white beans, drained and rinsed
1 ½ teaspoons dried fennel seed, crushed with fingers, divided
1 teaspoon dried oregano
1 teaspoon smoked paprika
1 ½ teaspoon kosher salt, divided
2 bunches Tuscan kale (or 1 large bunch curly kale), chopped
Shredded Parmesan or Pecorino Romano cheese for serving, optional

Directions

Prepare the onion and carrot as noted above.
In a large pot or Dutch oven, heat the olive oil and butter (or all olive oil) over medium high heat. Add the onion and carrots and sauté for 5 to 7 minutes until tender.
Add the diced tomatoes, vegetable broth and beans. Bring to a steady simmer, then add 1 teaspoon of the fennel seed, along with the dried oregano, smoked paprika and kosher salt. Simmer 12 minutes. (Meanwhile, chop the kale.)
Add the kale and simmer additional 2 to 3 minutes until the kale is tender. Add the additional ½ teaspoon crushed fennel seed. Taste a cooled spoonful and add up to ½ teaspoon additional kosher salt (depending on the salt level of your broth and beans), until the flavor pops.
Serve immediately with grated Parmesan or Pecorino Romano cheese. Store refrigerated for 3 days or frozen up to 3 months.

Sweet Rain

On the Farm

I am listening to the rain as I write. It’s soft, but it is a start. Our area was designated as a severe drought over the last week. I don’t keep up with my rain gauge enough to know for certain, but looking back through my notes from the summer, I don’t know if we have gotten more than a few inches since June. Anyone reading local to Fitzwilliam that has an accurate gauge?

What we got today will have to suffice for the veggies, but it isn’t doing much to saturate the soil. Most of this light rain never makes it past the surface. A fellow frisbee player mentioned “hydrophobic soil conditions” yesterday due to the drought. When the soil dries out completely, it is not readily available to take on moisture, and actually prevents the rain from penetrating deep into the ground. Instead water tends to bead off the soil and pool. I cross my fingers for a light rain before any downpour because it primes the soil to take on a heavier water load. If we get the projected thunderstorms tomorrow, today’s rain is perfect for priming the soil to capture more moisture below the surface. If not, the little water will help, but it will be out of the soil in a day or two.

Regardless, I planned for rain and we will be spending the day planting tomorrow. We’re a couple weeks late on our planting schedule for fall because of the lack of moisture in the soil. There was no point risking transplant loss without any rain in the forecast, and we gave the starts a healthy dose of fish fertilizer to keep them happy in their pots. Now, though, we don’t have much of an option than to plant and cross our fingers for favorable weather. The crew handled harvest in the morning while I started prepping beds to be planted in. I wanted to make sure that we weren’t going to be using the tractor later in the day when the fields would be wet. Tomorrow and later this week we will spend the days planting beets, broccoli, cauliflower, chard, bok choy, cabbage, and lettuce.

More on what is in shares this week below

SUMMER SHARES WEEK 11!

A reminder that we are on the even week schedule for half shares. FULL SHARES receive a basket every week. HALF SHARES receive a basket every other week.

EVEN WEEKS

Week 2 – 6/22 Week 10 – 8/17
Week 4 – 7/6 Week 12 – 8/31
Week 6 – 7/20 Week 14 – 9/14
Week 8 – 8/3 Week 16 – 9/28

ODD WEEKS

Week 1 – 6/15 Week 9 – 8/10
Week 3 – 6/29 Week 11 – 8/24
Week 5 – 7/13 Week 13 – 9/7
Week 7 – 7/27 Week 15 – 9/21

Cabbage is a new addition for this week. Carrots will be in shares again. We are working through the end of our smaller early carrots before we move on to the next bed. The new bed is sizing up nicely and should be in shares by next week. Hopefully we’ll get some rain to help. Celery is back in shares as we finish of the bed. Eggplant is going to shares. We grow a Japanese eggplant that is long and skinny, and the classic Italian eggplant. They can be used the same. Garlic is a staple. Head Lettuce is back in shares. Peppers, Summer Squash, and Zucchini are all staples. Tomatoes will finally be ready! Both cherries and slicers should make it into shares this week.

It looks like we have seen the last of our cucumbers for the season. There may be some in our store, and we’ll put them on the swap table as well for members.

Check for recipes below!

Shares Week 11:
Cabbage
Carrots
Celery
Eggplant
Garlic
Head Lettuce
Kale
Onions
Peppers
Summer Squash and Zucchini
Tomatoes

Egg Share: CHECK LIST FOR NAME
Bread Share: Red Pepper Cheddar CHECK LIST FOR NAME

LINK: RATATOUILLE

A member recommended ratatouille for one of the recipes this week. It’s a perfect dish for the farm share!

Ingredients

Veggies

2 eggplants
6 roma tomatoes
2 yellow squashes
2 zucchinis

Sauce

2 tablespoons olive oil
1 onion, diced
4 cloves garlic, minced
1 red bell pepper, diced
1 yellow bell pepper, diced
salt, to taste
pepper, to taste
28 oz can of crushed tomatoes
2 tablespoons chopped fresh basil, from 8-10 leaves

Herb Seasoning

2 tablespoons chopped fresh basil, from 8-10 leaves
1 teaspoon garlic, minced
2 tablespoons Chopped fresh parsley
2 teaspoons fresh thyme
salt, to taste
pepper, to taste
4 tablespoons olive oil

Directions

Preheat the oven for 375˚F (190˚C).
Slice the eggplant, tomatoes, squash, and zucchini into approximately ¹⁄₁₆-inch (1-mm) rounds, then set aside.
Make the sauce: Heat the olive oil in a 12-inch (30-cm) oven-safe pan over medium-high heat. Sauté the onion, garlic, and bell peppers until soft, about 10 minutes. Season with salt and pepper, then add the crushed tomatoes. Stir until the ingredients are fully incorporated. Remove from heat, then add the basil. Stir once more, then smooth the surface of the sauce with a spatula.
Arrange the sliced veggies in alternating patterns, (for example, eggplant, tomato, squash, zucchini) on top of the sauce from the outer edge to the middle of the pan. Season with salt and pepper.
Make the herb seasoning: In a small bowl, mix together the basil, garlic, parsley, thyme, salt, pepper, and olive oil. Spoon the herb seasoning over the vegetables.
Cover the pan with foil and bake for 40 minutes. Uncover, then bake for another 20 minutes, until the vegetables are softened.
Serve while hot as a main dish or side. The ratatouille is also excellent the next day–cover with foil and reheat in a 350˚F (180˚C) oven for 15 minutes, or simply microwave to desired temperature.
Enjoy!

LINK: FRENCH ONION KALE SOUP

Another one from a member! This is for anyone that is still using up their beets from last week.
Thank you, Julie!

Ingredients

1 big bunches green kale (6-8 stems)
8 cups water
3 big yellow onions
2-3 tablespoons butter
1 teaspoon of kosher salt for cooking the kale + a little more for the onions
2 bay leaves
3 tablespoons cognac
1 cup white wine ( i used cono sur viognier)
1 tablespoon maple syrup
1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper or more to taste
1/2 teaspoon ground dried thyme or more to taste
6 tablespoons liquid chicken broth concentrate (like Bovril)
11/2 to 2 cups fresh grated cheese, i used half gruyere half parmesan, but a old cheddar might be good too!
4 cloves of garlic
4-6 slice of rustic bread, sliced one inch thick
1 dash freshly grated nutmeg and freshly ground black pepper

Directions

Wash kale and make sure its really clean, since we will use the cooking liquid for the soup broth and we don’t want to find a little bug or fly in there 😉 . Remove stems and cook uncovered in 8 cups of salted water for about 12 min or until tender
Cut onions in half and thinly sliced them, in a large pot (i used my large creuset) melt butter, add onions and bay leaves, sprinkle with kosher salt and fresh ground pepper. Cook for about 15 min on low heat until translucent and very soft
Deglazed with cognac cook for a min and then add white wine and cook on high heat for 5 minutes
take the Kale out of the cooking liquid and add liquid to onions mixture. Set kale aside, it will be added to the soup later
add maple syrup, thyme and cayenne pepper to the soup and cook uncovered for 25 minutes, then add the chopped cooked kale to the soup
in the meantime toast the bread and rub each slice with garlic clove, set aside until soup is ready to assemble
in oven proof bowls add one tablespoon of cheese to each bowl, add soup, top with a garlicky crouton and cover with cheese, broil in the oven until gold and bubbly. Add fresh black pepper and a dash of fresh nutmeg before serving, Enjoy!

Tracie’s Farm Weekly Newsletter — Dog Days of Summer, kinda…

On the Farm

The ambient temperature would make it seem like the heat has broken, but working out in the fields today it felt as hot as it was last week. The so called “Dog Days of Summer” are technically past us. It comes from Greek tradition and denotes about a six week period of time when the star Sirius in the constellation Canis Major (big dog) rises at the same time as the sun. It was believed that the power of the sun combined with this bright star made it the hottest time of the year. I use it loosely, because mid-August is the dog days, if you ask me.

I was thinking more about why August seems like the hardest month as a farmer. My body is tired and the end is still out of grasp. It’s a time of year that is bemoaned between farmers. Tracie always give a sympathetic look when I am worrying about the farm in August. The flush of energy that comes with spring is behind us, kind of like the plants. Fatigue is starting to set in but we are still in the thick of planting, harvesting, and maintaining most of the beds on the farm. The days are getting shorter, faster, and it is harder to wake up early to get those last few beds prepped before the day begins. Not only that, but plant growth has slowed and the joy of watching plants double in size overnight won’t be seen until next spring. It is the beginning of the wind down to fall and winter and it’s a time where we farmers are tired and facing our last big push before the end of the season.

Right now part of our last push is on hold while we wait for rain again. Story of the summer, really. We have about 15 beds of beets, broccoli, cabbage, cauliflower, lettuce, and probably something else I’m not thinking of at the moment that want to go in the ground ASAP. It is way too dry, and that rain we got last week has pretty much all left the soil already. Even with the cooler weather and our naturally wet soils, it would be a risk to plant starts without rain in the forecast. There is a silver lining, and it is that we get more time to weed! The most popular activity on the veggie farm. One good thing about a dry year is that the weeds don’t take off as quick. We still have a couple beds that are right in a crucial stage where if they don’t get weeded now, they’ll be lost to weeds before they can mature. There is a chance of rain on Wednesday, but if not, we’ll give our starts a heavy dose of fish fertilizer and make sure we stay on track with the plants in the ground.

Rain would be nice for the veggies. More on summer shares below:

SUMMER SHARES WEEK 10!

A reminder that we are on the even week schedule for half shares. FULL SHARES receive a basket every week. HALF SHARES receive a basket every other week.

EVEN WEEKS

Week 2 – 6/22 Week 10 – 8/17
Week 4 – 7/6 Week 12 – 8/31
Week 6 – 7/20 Week 14 – 9/14
Week 8 – 8/3 Week 16 – 9/28

ODD WEEKS

Week 1 – 6/15 Week 9 – 8/10
Week 3 – 6/29 Week 11 – 8/24
Week 5 – 7/13 Week 13 – 9/7
Week 7 – 7/27 Week 15 – 9/21

Arugula is the loose green this week. It won’t be as big of a bag. I know arugula can be a polarizing veggie, but it’s the green that is working for us best right now. I’m not sure what is going on with our lettuce mix, but I have tried seeding it over and over without any luck so far this year. I’ve even moved fields with no luck. I’ll keep trying, but for the time being arugula is the green. Carrots will be in shares. They are the last of our smaller carrots. There are a few new beds that look promising for the coming weeks, but Wednesday will see the end of our early season beds. Celery is new. This won’t look like the celery you get in stores. It is darker green and thinner. Perfect for soups. Cukes are probably seeing their last couple of weeks. It has been a disappointing cucumber year for us. Our high tunnel was over run with cucumber beetles spreading bacterial wilt. Next year we will have to invest in insect netting to exclude them from the growing zone. Eggplant is going to shares. We grow a Japanese eggplant that is long and skinny, and the classic Italian eggplant. They can be used the same. Garlic is a staple. Head Lettuce is back in shares. Peppers, Summer Squash, and Zucchini are all staples. Tomatoes will finally be ready! Both cherries and slicers should make it into shares this week.

Check for recipes below!

Shares Week 10:
Arugula
Carrots
Celery
Cucumbers
Eggplant
Garlic
Head Lettuce
Peppers
Summer Squash and Zucchini
Tomatoes

Egg Share: CHECK LIST FOR NAME
Bread Share: Red Pepper Cheddar CHECK LIST FOR NAME

LINK: YELLOW SQUASH CASSEROLE

This recipe was shared by one of our members! Thank you, Molly!

Ingredients

6 small yellow squash, thinly sliced
½ cup sour cream
2 large eggs, room temperature
1 tablespoon dried minced onion
1 teaspoon fresh thyme
½ teaspoon salt
¼ teaspoon pepper
1 cup grated cheddar cheese
¾ cup panko breadcrumbs
2 tablespoon butter, melted
1 teaspoon garlic salt
1 tablespoon Parmesan cheese
1 tablespoon fresh chopped parsley

Directions

Preheat your oven to 350 degrees F. Lightly grease or spray a 2-quart casserole dish or 9×13-inch baking pan with non-stick cooking spray.
Wash and thinly slice the yellow squash. Place the slices into a large mixing bowl.
In a medium mixing bowl, combine the sour cream, eggs, fresh thyme, salt, and pepper. Fold in grated cheese then pour over the sliced yellow squash. Mix to combine.
Transfer the squash and cheese mixture into the prepared baking dish.
In a small bowl, combine panko breadcrumbs with the melted butter and garlic salt, plus parmesan and fresh parsley if desired. Sprinkle the topping mixture over the squash in your baking dish, then transfer to the center of the middle rack in your preheated oven.
Bake for 30-35 minutes or until the cheese is melted and starting to bubble and the topping is lightly golden brown in color. You can also broil on low for the last few minutes to finish browning the panko topping.
Remove from the oven and serve immediately.

JULIE’S BEET SALAD

Another one from a member! This is for anyone that is still using up their beets from last week.
Thank you, Julie!

Ingredients

Beets sliced thin
Cucumber sliced thin
Onions sliced thin
Chopped cilantro
Himalayan pink salt
Cracked pepper
Olive oil
Balsamic vinegar

Directions

Tossed and marinated in refrigerator for 2 or more hours.

LINK: TOMATO SOUP

I really love tomato soup. It is one of my favorite late summer dishes, especially with grilled cheese.

Ingredients

▢ 2 tablespoons good olive oil
▢ 1 Large Onion chopped
▢ 1 carrot chopped
▢ 2 stalks celery chopped
▢ 3 cloves garlic chopped
▢ 2 cups chicken stock
▢ 56 oz whole tomatoes (two 28oz cans) crushed
▢ salt and freshly ground pepper
▢ ½ cup heavy cream whipping cream or half and half

Directions

Start with adding the carrots, celery, and onion to a food processor with the regular blade.
In a large pot, heat the olive oil over medium heat. Add the chopped onions, carrots and celery and cook over medium-low heat for 10 minutes, stirring occasionally, until soft.
Add the garlic and cook for another minute.
Stir in the chicken stock, tomatoes and salt and pepper to taste.
Bring the soup to a boil, then lower the heat and simmer for 20 minutes.
remove from the heat, add the cream, and using a hand blender carefully puree the soup. If you’re worried about burning yourself, wait until the soup cools before pureeing.

Weekly Update 8/8

On the Farm

Ah, August. What better way to put it than two late nights working on the newsletter in a row. This is the hard month of the season. The weeds wanna grow faster than the plants and the fields need to be rearranged for fall planting, our harvest list keeps growing and everything wants to be picked at once, and we’re trying to keep it all together through the hottest days of the year. August.

On the bright side, the rain we got over the weekend was a huge help. On Saturday morning our area was officially designated as severe drought conditions. I doubt any of the storms will make a huge impact, but raindrops make rivers and we’ll take what we can get. Sever drought conditions can affect crop growth, fruit development, and microbial activity in the soil. It is gonna take a lot of raindrops to correct the current condition.

Planting is a guessing game at this point. The chance of rain jumps from 100 to 0 in an hour. I’m hoping we’ll get a chance to plant tomorrow. Even if it doesn’t rain tomorrow, there is a storm passing over now that might give us enough moisture for the plugs to take. The heat will pass and some cooler days will help the transplants.

Shares are still looking good. I’ll get into them below with updates from the rows.

SUMMER SHARES WEEK 9!

A reminder that we are on the even week schedule for half shares. FULL SHARES receive a basket every week. HALF SHARES receive a basket every other week.

EVEN WEEKS

Week 2 – 6/22 Week 10 – 8/17
Week 4 – 7/6 Week 12 – 8/31
Week 6 – 7/20 Week 14 – 9/14
Week 8 – 8/3 Week 16 – 9/28

ODD WEEKS

Week 1 – 6/15 Week 9 – 8/10
Week 3 – 6/29 Week 11 – 8/24
Week 5 – 7/13 Week 13 – 9/7
Week 7 – 7/27 Week 15 – 9/21

Basil will see its way back into shares this week. We still have a lot in the field and it needs to be cut back to stay productive. Beets are making their long awaited appearance in shares. I’m hoping some later rounds will fare better than our first. They will be small beets this week, but perfect for roasting whole! Plus there is going to be Sage in shares because I think it pairs nicely with beets. Cauliflower is in shares again this week. I recommend buffalo cauliflower. It is not in the recipes this week, but it is an easy one to google. Cucumbers will be in shares for a few more weeks. Our tunnels are looking sad, but there is still some life left in the plants. Fennel is in shares again. Cilantro will be our third herb of the week. It’s a lot of herbs this week due to how things are growing, but they are versatile and elevate any dish you make. Fennel and Cilantro have a recipe below. Garlic is a weekly occurrence. Greens Mix has been reliable. Peppers are in full season. Hopefully Jalapenos as well. Squash! Lots of it! Plus lots on our swap table! It’s coming out of our ears right now. I don’t want to overload members, but I do need to unload a fair amount. Tomatoes. Not yet! Cherries are coming in, but the reds still need another week. We’re giving what we get for the time being. They should come in heavy any day now.

Check for recipes below!

Shares Week 9:
Basil
Beets
Cauliflower
Cilantro
Cucumbers
Fennel
Garlic
Greens Mix
Peppers
Sage
Summer Squash and Zucchini
Tomatoes of some variety

Egg Share: CHECK LIST FOR NAME
Bread Share: Red Pepper Cheddar CHECK LIST FOR NAME

LINK: SAUTEED BEETS WITH PASTA, SAGE, AND BROWN BUTTER

Beets and Sage is one of my favorite combos!

Ingredients

4 tablespoons butter
1 ½ pounds beets, peeled and grated
20 fresh sage leaves
Cooked pasta

Directions

Put butter in a large skillet over medium-high heat. Heat butter until it turns nutty brown, then add the beets and sage leaves.
Cook, stirring occasionally, until the beets are tender and lightly browned, about 10 minutes. Add some cooked pasta and toss. Garnish with Parmesan.

LINK: SUMMER SQUASH AND BASIL PASTA

Ingredients

¼ cup olive oil
8 garlic cloves, thinly sliced
2 pounds assorted summer squashes and zucchini, quartered lengthwise, sliced
Kosher salt
1 teaspoon Aleppo-style pepper, plus more for serving
12 ounces paccheri, ziti, or other large tube pasta
2 ounces Parmesan, grated (about ½ cup), plus more for serving
1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
½ cup basil leaves, divided

Directions

Heat oil in a large skillet over medium. Cook garlic, stirring occasionally, until very lightly browned around the edges, about 4 minutes. Add squash and increase heat to medium high; season with salt. Cook, tossing occasionally, until squash begins to break down. Turn down heat once it begins sticking, and continue to cook until the squash is jammy and soft, 12–15 minutes. Toss in 1 tsp. Aleppo-style pepper.
Meanwhile, cook pasta in a large pot of boiling salted water, stirring occasionally, until very al dente.
Transfer pasta to skillet with squash using a slotted spoon or spider and add ½ cup pasta cooking liquid. Cook pasta, adding 2 oz. Parmesan in stages along with more pasta cooking liquid as needed, until sauce coats pasta and pasta is al dente. Toss in lemon juice and most of the basil.
Divide pasta among bowls and top with more Parmesan and Aleppo-style pepper and remaining basil.

LINK: SESAME, CILANTRO, AND ROASTED FENNEL RICE BOWL

Ingredients

1/3 cup short-grain brown rice
1 tbsp apple cider vinegar
1 tbsp tamari
salt to taste
1 fennel bulb
2 red bell peppers
olive oil (as desired)
2 to 4 tbsp cilantro
1 avocado
2 tbsp sesame seeds

Dressing

4 garlic cloves unpeeled
3 tbsp olive oil
2 tsp apple cider vinegar
1 tsp tamari

Directions

Cook the brown rice in 1 cup water with the vinegar, tamari and salt to taste. This should take about 40 minutes.
Preheat the oven to 400°F.
Slice the fennel lengthwise. Cut each pepper into about 8 pieces. Place them on a baking sheet, drizzle with olive oil and sprinkle with salt. Bake for 15–20 minutes, until the edges are browning. For the last 10 minutes, add the garlic cloves (they will be used in the dressing).
Let the rice, vegetables and garlic cool.
Finely chop the cilantro. Cut the avocado into bite-size chunks. Roughly chop the roast vegetables and stir into the rice, with the avocado and sesame seeds.
Make the dressing. Peel the garlic and mash with a fork (it should be really soft). Mix in all the other ingredients. Stir into the rice and sprinkle with the cilantro.

Check out the Farm Store!

The best days to come to the farm store are Thursday morning through Sunday! We try to keep it stocked earlier in the week, but the largest variety comes over the weekend.

We’ll have corn for the month of August! Eggs, veggies, milk, treats, and more!

Weekly Update 8/1

On the Farm

Getting the newsletter out pretty late tonight, so I’m keeping it short.

I took a rare summer vacation at the end of last week to visit my parents, sisters, and niece and nephews over the weekend. It was good to get away for a couple days, but boy does the farm change a lot in four days. I’m still getting reacquainted with the fields after a long walk at dusk last night and working in them today. There are a lot of beds to check in on, and getting my head around what is happening where takes time. As I’ve always said, the farm is an ever changing landscape, and the plants wait for no one. Plus the rest of the farmers kept farming, and did a great job!

This week we will be W-E-E-D-I-N-G cause what else do veggie farmers do. Lots of things, actually, but they all come second to giving the crops room to grow. We’ll also be trellising cherry tomatoes in the greenhouse, fertilizing long season crops, and seeding for the fall. Hope everyone has a great week!

SUMMER SHARES WEEK 8!

A reminder that we are on the even week schedule for half shares. FULL SHARES receive a basket every week. HALF SHARES receive a basket every other week.

EVEN WEEKS

Week 2 – 6/22 Week 10 – 8/17
Week 4 – 7/6 Week 12 – 8/31
Week 6 – 7/20 Week 14 – 9/14
Week 8 – 8/3 Week 16 – 9/28

ODD WEEKS

Week 1 – 6/15 Week 9 – 8/10
Week 3 – 6/29 Week 11 – 8/24
Week 5 – 7/13 Week 13 – 9/7
Week 7 – 7/27 Week 15 – 9/21

BLUEBERRY SHARES! We will have blueberries out tomorrow for members who signed up for the berry share! Since blueberry season can be short, we’re gonna try and give everyone as many as possible in the first couple weeks. This week members will get double what ever they signed up for. In the barn will be a list with your name and the number of blueberry pints you should take home. Please check the list!

There is plenty of variety as we move in to the heart of the summer season. Basil is back in shares as a fresh herb this week. We are hoping to give big bunches for pesto making! Carrots are in shares and hope to stay that way for the next few weeks. Cauliflower replaces broccoli this week. The heat has been a real downer on the brassicas. The cauliflower will have a yellow tint to it. Totally fine and shouldn’t affect its use. It is a reaction to being exposed to light. Cucumbers are a weekly item. Fennel is new this week! The bulbs didn’t size up exactly how we would have liked, but they are still tasty. Flowers! We are overrun with snap dragons and will be including some in everyones share this week. Garlic is a staple. Greens Mix is some type of brassica based salad mix. We’ve struggled with our lettuce mix so far this year. I will be changing fields and see if that has an impact. Kale as a leafy green. This is kind of to replace lettuce heads which will be out of shares for at least a couple weeks while we wait for the heat of summer to pass. Onions. Can’t really call them green anymore. Fresh? They’ll have the tops lopped off this week. They’re just regular onions that haven’t fully cured yet. Peppers are starting to pick up production in the field. Squash and Zukes are a staple for a few more weeks. Tomatoes had a little bit of a false start. Some of the fruit started to turn red, but the bulk of it is still green and sizing up. There will be some tomatoes in shares, but the heavy season is still a couple weeks away.

Check for recipes below!

Shares Week 8:
Basil
Carrots
Cauliflower
Cucumbers
Fennel
Flowers!
Garlic
Greens Mix
Kale
Onions
Peppers
Summer Squash and Zucchini
Tomatoes of some variety

Egg Share: CHECK LIST FOR NAME
Bread Share: Maple Oat CHECK LIST FOR NAME

LINK: PASTA SALAD WITH FENNEL GREEN GODDESS DRESSING

This recipe is the reason why I started growing fennel on the farm. One of my favorite summer pasta recipes. The New York Times has the original recipe I used. Unfortunately it is pay-walled, but this recipe seems like a good alternative.

Ingredients

16 ounces of pasta of choice (453 grams)
1 cup vegan sour cream
1 cup packed basil leaves
¼ cup parsley
¼ cup fennel fronds (or fresh dill weed)
2 cloves garlic
6 scallions, white and green parts
2 tablespoons of lemon juice
1 cup of sliced fennel bulb (keep ¼ of the fonds)
1 cup arugula (rocket)
1 cup sugar snap peas (cut into bite-sized pieces)

Directions

Cook the pasta. Begin by heating a large pot of water. When it reaches a boil, add the pasta. Taste it to check for doneness. Once it’s tender yet firm, immediately drain it and rinse it with cool water to keep it from sticking.
Blend the dressing ingredients. Add vegan sour cream, basil, parsley, fennel fonds, garlic, 3 scallions, and lemon juice to a food processor or blender. Combine the ingredients until smooth. Add more lemon juice or water if you want to make it thinner.
Finish the salad. Mix the dressing and pasta in a large bowl, then add the sliced fennel, arugula, and sugar snap peas. Adjust the flavors. Add salt and black pepper if desired. If the salad starts to cease (dry out), add a few tablespoons of lemon juice to freshen it up.

LINK: KALE AND FENNEL SKILLET

Ingredients

2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
1 small onion, thinly sliced
1 small fennel bulb, thinly sliced
1/2 pound fully cooked apple chicken sausage links or cooked Italian sausage links, halved lengthwise and sliced into half-moons
2 garlic cloves, minced
3 tablespoons dry sherry or dry white wine
1 tablespoon herbes de Provence
1/8 teaspoon salt
1/8 teaspoon pepper
1 bunch kale, trimmed and torn into bite-sized pieces

Directions

In a large cast-iron or other heavy skillet, heat olive oil over medium-high heat. Add onion and fennel; cook and stir until onion begins to brown, 6-8 minutes. Add sausage, garlic, sherry and seasonings; cook until sausage starts to caramelize, 4-6 minutes.
Add kale; cook, covered, stirring occasionally, until kale is tender, 15-17 minutes.

LINK: ZUCCHINI FRITTERS

Gonna keep this one up for folks! A member emailed letting me know she follows a similar recipe, but freezes them the be enjoyed through the winter!

Ingredients

1 ½ pounds zucchini, grated
¾ teaspoon salt
¼ cup all-purpose flour
¼ cup grated Parmesan cheese
1 large egg, beaten
2 cloves garlic, minced
kosher salt and ground black pepper to taste
2 tablespoons olive oil

Directions

Toss zucchini and salt together in a large colander and place in sink to drain for 10 minutes.
Transfer zucchini to the center of a piece of cheesecloth; wrap cheesecloth around zucchini and squeeze to drain as much moisture as possible.
Mix flour, Parmesan cheese, egg, and garlic together in a large bowl. Stir in zucchini, then season with kosher salt and pepper.
Heat olive oil in a large skillet over medium-high heat.
Working in batches, scoop tablespoonfuls of zucchini mixture into the hot skillet and fry until golden brown, about 2 minutes per side.

Weekly Update 7/25

lettuce Mix

On the Farm

We’re starting to get used to these Monday morning thunderstorms. I think we’ve had three so far this year. We start harvest for the week on Monday and all morning long we were surrounded by distant, rolling thunder. The storms missed us for the most part during the day and the bulk of the rain came last night for us. But boy is it still dry in the fields! This might be the driest I’ve ever seen the farm, even after all the rain over the last week. We dug new potatoes this afternoon and the soil was STILL DRY just two inches down. The flipped over bed looked like the rainstorm missed it. It goes to show how bad we needed it to rain. I mentioned last week that we would need a few more storms to saturate the soil again, and it looks like we still need a few more.

All that being said, I prefer farming in a dry year on our fields. Our soil is a sandy loam, but it still holds a lot of water during a wet year. We also sit on a fairly high water table. I didn’t realize it until I was planting some fruit trees a few years ago, but about a foot and a half down the water started to pool in the tree hole. That’s all dependent on the rainfall, but it goes to show what the opposite can be on the farm. Over the years I have tried to cut these areas out of the growing space, but standing water in certain parts of fields is not uncommon. Because our soil holds water so well, dry years tend to be easier on the plants. We’ve had opportune rains this year. Usually enough to keep crops growing when they needed it, but not so much that we’re seeing water in the fields.

We pulled our garlic last week! nearly 8,000 bulbs with some help from a few CSA members. One of our farmers, Tiffany, made a garlic themed lunch with pizza and soup. A big thank you to everyone who showed up to lend a hand. I love getting to work with our members!

Now the garlic will sit on benches in our greenhouse to cure for a couple weeks before we start cleaning and sorting it into share garlic and garlic for replanting. The farm kinda stinks right now because of it. We lop the tops off before curing and the stalks in the compost pile have been wafting across the fields.I love the smell of garlic, but not so much when it has been sitting in the sun decomposing for a couple days.

Other than that its harvest and weeding on the farm, with a few other maintenance tasks mixed in throughout the week. We’ll plant another round of broccoli and fennel this week to break up some of the weeding. At least the heat wave has passed. Our crew did a great job over the last week!

IMG 8126 2

Turkeys in Need of Rehoming!

A couple of community members recently lost their home in a fire, and are now looking for someone to take the turkeys they have been raising. Due to the lack of water/electricity at their current property they are no longer able to adequately care for the turkeys.

In need of a new home are:

8 Mature turkeys (4 of each sex) born March 26th are around 15lbs and could be processed anytime now.

6 young turkeys (3 of each sex) 5 weeks old.

Please text or call Tiffany if you are able to take these turkeys (no cost).

603-831-9409

SUMMER SHARES WEEK 7!

A reminder that we are on the even week schedule for half shares. FULL SHARES receive a basket every week. HALF SHARES receive a basket every other week.

EVEN WEEKS

Week 2 – 6/22 Week 10 – 8/17
Week 4 – 7/6 Week 12 – 8/31
Week 6 – 7/20 Week 14 – 9/14
Week 8 – 8/3 Week 16 – 9/28

ODD WEEKS

Week 1 – 6/15 Week 9 – 8/10
Week 3 – 6/29 Week 11 – 8/24
Week 5 – 7/13 Week 13 – 9/7
Week 7 – 7/27 Week 15 – 9/21

BLUEBERRY SHARES! We will have blueberries out tomorrow for members who signed up for the berry share! Since blueberry season can be short, we’re gonna try and give everyone as many as possible in the first couple weeks. This week members will get double what ever they signed up for. In the barn will be a list with your name and the number of blueberry pints you should take home. Please check the list!

Baskets will look similar but different this week. Arugula has been a steady salad green for us so far this season. Broccoli is going into shares! It got away from us in the heat a little bit over the weekend 😦 so the heads aren’t the well rounded domes you are used to, but it is still good for cooking with! Carrots are making their debut. They are slender, but perfect for roasting whole. See the recipe below. Cukes are mainstays for the foreseeable future. Head Lettuce somehow made it through the heatwave without bolting this week. We’ll see about next week. Garlic is going to be a weekly staple for the remainder of the season. Green Onions are back in shares. Parsley is the fresh herb for the week. Potatoes will be in shares one more time until the fall. Nightshades are coming! They will be slow to start, but everyone’s favorite crops are coming in to maturity. This week all baskets will see either peppers or tomatoes until the plants pick up production. Summer Squash and Zucchini exploded in the field with the heat over the weekend. Seriously, it’s like they had a party out there. They will be on the bigger side this week until we get a handle on the new beds.

Check for recipes below!

Shares Week 7:
Arugula
Broccoli
Carrots
Cucumbers
Head Lettuce
Garlic
Green Onions
Parsley
Potatoes
Peppers or Tomatoes
Summer Squash and Zucchini

Egg Share: CHECK LIST FOR NAME
Bread Share: Onion Pepper Parmesan CHECK LIST FOR NAME

LINK: ZUCCHINI FRITTERS

Ingredients

1 ½ pounds zucchini, grated
¾ teaspoon salt
¼ cup all-purpose flour
¼ cup grated Parmesan cheese
1 large egg, beaten
2 cloves garlic, minced
kosher salt and ground black pepper to taste
2 tablespoons olive oil

Directions

Toss zucchini and salt together in a large colander and place in sink to drain for 10 minutes.
Transfer zucchini to the center of a piece of cheesecloth; wrap cheesecloth around zucchini and squeeze to drain as much moisture as possible.
Mix flour, Parmesan cheese, egg, and garlic together in a large bowl. Stir in zucchini, then season with kosher salt and pepper.
Heat olive oil in a large skillet over medium-high heat.
Working in batches, scoop tablespoonfuls of zucchini mixture into the hot skillet and fry until golden brown, about 2 minutes per side.

LINK: POTATO SALAD WITH ARUGULA AND DIJON VINAIGRETTE

Ingredients

1/2 small red onion, peeled and roughly chopped
2 pounds new potatoes, scrubbed and cut into bite-sized pieces
Salt
1 tablespoon rice vinegar
Freshly ground black pepper
2 tablespoons finely chopped chives
3 cups arugula, stems removed, washed and dried and very roughly chopped
2 tablespoons red wine vinegar
1 tablespoon Dijon mustard
5 tablespoons good olive oil

Directions

Put the onion in a small bowl and cover with cold water (this will remove some of the bite). Put the potatoes in a large pot of generously salted water. Bring to a boil over high heat.
Lower the heat so the water is barely simmering and cook for about 10 minutes, until you can pierce the potatoes with the tip of a sharp knife and it slips out easily. Drain the potatoes well and pour them into a large bowl.
Gently toss the warm potatoes with the rice vinegar, 1/4 teaspoon salt, and 1/2 teaspoon pepper. Add the chives, arugula and red onion and stir through.
Whisk together the red wine vinegar, mustard and olive oil in a small bowl. Add salt and pepper to taste. Pour over the potato mixture and toss to combine. Serve warm or keep covered at room temperature for up to an hour.

LINK: ROASTED CARROTS

Ingredients

2 pounds carrots, peeled quartered or cut into sixths lengthwise depending on the size, then into 2-inch lengths
3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
Salt
freshly ground pepper
1 teaspoon fresh thyme leaves, chopped
½ teaspoon oregano
3 tablespoons finely chopped flat-leaf parsley

Directions

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees. Oil a sheet pan or a baking dish large enough to fit all of the carrots in a single layer. Place the carrots in a large bowl, and toss with the olive oil, salt, pepper, thyme and oregano.
Spread in an even layer in the prepared pan or baking dish. Cover with foil, and place in the oven for 30 minutes. Uncover, and if the carrots are not yet tender, turn the heat down to 375 degrees and return to the oven for 10 to 15 more minutes until tender. Add the parsley, stir gently, and taste and adjust salt and pepper. Serve hot, warm or at room temperature.
Dahlia 50% EVERYTHING IN THE PLANT STAND! It’s all going on sale! We want to shutter the stand until mums in the fall, so help take the rest of the plants, window boxes, and hanging baskets off our hands! Everything will be marked down 50% and there are still some really nice baskets and boxes out there. Particularly the begonia hanging baskets.